I was originally licensed in 1988 while living in Ida Grove, IA as KB0CFP.  Believe me it is absolutely no fun being the only ham in town. 

I earned my novice ticket initially and within a month after passing my novice test, I went to Sioux City, IA and passed my Technician class.  I then moved back to Des Moines and became involved in the local club and tried to help out at as many events as I could.  Unfortunately my employment killed many of these opportunities for me as I worked a lot of weekends.  Retail management has the tendency to kill one's weekends. 
During the flood's of 1993, I was stationed in West Des Moines assisting in communications for that very long night. 
1995 found me moving to Fort Dodge, IA where, I took advantage of the opportunities and setup a packet BBS system at my home.  It wasn't much, but it worked very well and served the limited number of users in the area.  Unfortunately, local politics killed my spirit and I was inactive for almost 2 years before I decided to plug in a microphone.  I moved back to Des Moines in 1998 and slowly started getting back into the hobby. 
I have rejoined the local club and am now able to take part in special events.  Although they can be boring as all get out sometimes, they can be a lot of fun.
As for the history of WN0IFF, my dad was licensed back in the late 60's with this call.  When he upgraded to tech and ultimately General, he was told that he had to change his call so he became WB0IFF.  When I upgraded to General in 2000, I decided I'd get another call.  I had selected a couple of possible calls and threw WN0IFF into the list.  (I really didn't think I'd get as there were no calls of this type listed on the websight.)  I became WN0IFF on September 1, 2000.  (A belated birthday present from the FCC)

My home in Fort Dodge, IA.  (During my inactive time)

The history of WN0IFF.

The Amateur's Code

One:
The Amateur is Considerate… He never knowingly uses the air in such a way as to lessen the pleasure of others.

Two:
The Amateur is Loyal… He offers his loyalty , encouragement and support to his fellow radio amateurs, his local club and to the American Radio Relay League, through which Amateur Radio is represented.

Three:
The Amateur is Progressive….  He keeps his station abreast of science.  It is well built and efficient.  His operating practice is above reproach.

From the 1986 ARRL Handbook.  Written by Paul M. Segal

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e-mail:  wn0iff@arrl.net