222 FALL SPRINT 2008
SINGLE OPERATOR CATEGORY (hilltopping mobile)








ANTENNA SYSTEM

    8 element end-mount yagi horizontally polarized







RADIO EQUIPMENT

    Radio Shack HTX-100 10m mobile
    50 milliwatts

    Downeast Microwave 222 transverter
    35 watts

    Mirage C2512 amplifier
    120 watts









DESCRIPTION

The 222 MHz fall sprint 2008 was sponsored by SVHFS, the Southeastern VHF Society. This single band contest ran from 7pm until 11pm local time, Tuesday, September 30th, 2008.

Due to the low activity level expected for such a rare band, I decided not to enter the contest as a rover, and use all available time to make contacts. The location was the nearest rover site in my home gridsquare FN22. The antenna was at 1950+ feet above sea level and enjoyed a downward slope in all directions, plus there was no foliage in the immediate area. I arrived at the site in rain showers and was hearing occasional lightning static on 6m. I had to wait more than half an hour for the rain to stop, so some operating time was lost. The rain tapered off before 8 PM and surprisingly stayed away the rest of the contest despite the forecast of 70% chance of rain. I was still hearing lightning static on 222 all the way up to about 10 PM, even under a starry sky, and when I pointed the beam away from south, the lightning static would diminish. Temperatures stayed at a reasonable 56F with light winds.

The last fall 222 sprint in which I participated was 2005. I got more QSOs and grids this time, but was on the air longer, too, operating for 78% of this sprint versus 69% last time. My best DX to the west was VE3ZV EN92vw at 231 miles (372 km). Best to the southwest was my longest DX in this contest: W3KWH EN90 near Pittsburgh at 272 miles (437 km). Best to the south was K8GP in FM19. Turning the antenna through the northern directions a few times nabbed me only one contact: VE2JWH FN35 at 246 miles (396 km). Best to the east was K1TR FN42 at 224 miles (361 km) and to the northeast was K1WHS FN43 at 247 miles (397 km). I noticed lots of good operating technique--patience, switching from CW to PH to work my non-CW-equipped station, repeating callsigns and grids several times, in general...doing whatever it takes to complete the QSO.

Here is a list of stations I heard but was unable to work: N3NGE FN20, N1SV, WS3C, and WA2VNV FN30. I would have liked to hear activity out of FN01, 03, FN21, 23, 24, 25, and maybe FN33 and 34, but on the bright side, I did work my own grid--something I don't always see even on more popular bands. I came in 5th place for this event.







POINTS SUMMARY



BAND   QSOs   QSO    UNIQUE
              PTS.   GRIDS
---------------------------
222     18    36      15


--- Claimed score = 540 ---









LOG


EDT     CALLSIGN   GRID   OTHER
-------------------------------------------------------
1953    WZ1V       FN31
1956    W1RZF      FN42
0004    WA3NUF     FN20
0005    N2DCH      FN22   10w into 4-el
0007    KA2LIM     FN12   cross-mode
0011    K1WHS      FN43
0024    KK1CW      FN32
0053    N8KXG      EN91
0104    K3TUF      FN10
0108    N1DPM      FN32
0119    VE2JWH     FN35   cross-mode
0121    K1TR       FN42
0138    W3KWH      EN90
0139    K8GP       FM19   1500w into 22-el
0149    VE3ZV      EN92vw
0153    K2AN       FN02
0244    K2ERG      FN13
0256    AF1T       FN43









"If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the N2SLN rover team."