CHART OF CQx LETTERS for HSCW MS (see below for FSK MS):
North American HSMS calling frequencies: 50.300 MHz, 144.100 MHz.
North American FSK411 MS calling frequencies: 50.270 MHz, 144.140 MHz, 222.???.

A

1

F

6

K

11

P

16

U

21

Z

26

B

2

G

7

L

12

Q

17

V

22

 

 

C

3

H

8

M

13

R

18

W

23

 

 

D

4

I

9

N

14

S

19

X

24

 

 

E

5

J

10

O

15

T

20

Y

25

 

 

Usage of CQx Letter System:
Calling CQJ on 144.100 MHz means you will listen for replies on 144.100 MHz + 10 kHz or 144.110 MHz.
Calling CQM on 144.110 MHz means you will listen for replies on 144.110 MHz + 13 kHz or 144.123 MHz.

When you hear a reply on your listening frequency, immediately shift your transmitting frequency to that frequency and make your QSO. When finished, you may call QRZ on your listening frequency, or return to your CQ frequency and resume CQing for another QSO.

Note: The use of listening (and schedule) frequencies close to the calling frequency should be avoided to reduce the possibility of QRM from other stations calling CQ.

FSK411 - The same basic procedure is used, except "CQ Uxx" or "CQ Dxx" is used. E.g., "CQ U5" means "I'm listening and will reply Up 5 kHz," the same as "CQE"; "CQ D8" means "I'm listening and will reply Down 8 kHz".
(HSCW frequency is always given as the ZERO-BEAT Frequency. FSK frequency is the DIAL Frequency).

The CQ-Letter system works best on HSCW. The Uxx/Dxx system works best on FSK.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A QSO:

An exchange of both call signs, an exchange of some type of information or report, and an exchange of confirmation of reception of the report or information.
The exact exchange and format varies with the mode, type of propagation, whether or not it's in a contest, etc. But a valid contact still requires the same thing - exchange of calls, of information, and Rogers, in that order.
And remember that you do not send everything - in fact, each station sends approximately every other text. Read it carefully and it will be obvious what to send next.
(Region 2 general format. The Region 1 format may be slightly different).

When a station copies :

he sends:

less than both calls

both calls: E.g., W8WN KOØU W8WN KOØU...

both calls

both calls & report: E.g., W8WN 26 KOØU 2626....

both calls & report

Roger & report: E.g., R27 R27 R27 ...

Roger & report

Rs: E.g., RRR RRR RRR...

Rogers (you need at least two, or a very definite Roger, to be sure! CW, FSK, and voice can all be chopped up)

73s: E.g., 73 73 73...
(QSO is officially complete. Congratulations!)

73 (73s not required for contact; but other station doesn't know it's complete until he hears a 73 [or CQ]).

he may QRT. Or, if he has been calling CQ, begins CQing again, etc.

A typical HSCW MS exchange:

W8WN calls CQ for one minute on 144.100: CQJ W8WN CQJ W8WN CQJ W8WN...

N1BUG calls W8WN for one minute on 144.110: W8WN N1BUG W8WN N1BUG W8W...

W8WN copies N1BUG calling on 144.110; so he shifts his transmitter frequency to 144.110 and sends calls and report to N1BUG for one minute on 144.110 Mhz: N1BUG W8WN 26 N1BUG W8WN 26...

N1BUG copies both calls and the report and sends, for one minute and with no calls:

R 27 R 27 R 27 R 27 R ...

W8WN copies R and report and sends, for one minute: RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR...

N1BUG copies R's, and the QSO is complete. Note that if N1BUG has not copied Rs, he would continue sending R 27 R 27, etc. so that W8WN will keep sending Rs.

N1BUG should send 73 during the next transmitting sequence or two to tell W8WN that he has everything.

W8WN copies the 73s and replies with a few periods of 73s, then both quit sending and complete their log sheets. (He may wish to send QRZ? and listen for a moment before returning to 144.100 to call CQ again).

MISSING INFORMATION:
On HSCW MS operation, it is possible to request a missing piece of information.
(This does not work well on FSK MS at present. Better decode algorithms and less gibberish may change this in the future).

BBB

Both callsigns needed

MMM

My callsign needed

YYY

Your callsign needed

SSS

Signal Report Needed (Note: Signal Report is your grid in the NA HSMS Contest)

UUU

Your keying is Unreadable

When used, nothing but the appropriate string of letters is sent. The other operator should respond by sending only the requested information. When the requesting station has the needed data, he returns again to the proper exchange sequence.

Approximate ANTENNA ELEVATIONS for maximum signal at various distances:
For offsets in azimuth, see OH5IY's MSSoft MS program.
1000+ miles (1600+km) - 0 800 miles (1300 km) - 5 600 miles (1000 km) - 10 400 miles (650 km) - 15


NORTH AMERICAN CONVENTIONS FOR MS WORK, ALL MODES:
(European conventions are not the same, and EME is also different).

The Western-most station transmits the first period.
A mobile station, DXpediton station, or other special station will normally use the same period, regardless of direction (his choice - must announce it).
Signal report is normally the HSCW 2-number report. Mobiles (and /MM) often use grid squares. (Grid squares are required for many contests).
The "Request for Repeat" letters work well on HSCW. They do not work as well on FSK441 in the current version of WSJT.
Due to lower activity in North America, it is recommended that routine CQs be called on the expected calling frequencies.
If there appears to be a good chance of QRM, the CQ-letter (HSCW) and Uxx and Dxx (FSK) system is recommended.
On HSCW, CQs are now normally called at 6000 lpm. Schedule speeds are typically 6000-10,000 lpm.
On HSCW, the actual zero-beat frequency is always stated (see the HSCW-SOP for details).
On FSK, the dial reading frequency is always stated (due to the difference in the tones used).
The transmitter and receiver are operated in USB mode for both.
(For more details on HSCW MS, see HSCW-SOP). Many other helpful papers in the HSCW/FSK section.


TNX to W8WN for writing the original HSCWOP.DOC from which these tables are adapted. -- KXP
Modified to incorporate FSK411 MS - W8WN - 2001 August 10