KC7NYR Amateur Radio News

What is MURS?
MURS stands for Multi-Use Radio System and is a set of five VHF frequencies that have been set aside by the FCC for free personal or business use within the United States. There are rules that govern MURS radio transmission, but in general radios are limited to 2 watts of power and can cover a transmission distance of up to 15 miles.

MURS Frequencies: 154.820 MHz -151.890 MHz -151.940 MHz -154.570 MHz

 

Radio communications is a growing, cost-effective solution for environmental monitoring applications. The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) governs the allocation of communications frequencies world-wide, with participation by each nations communications authority (The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the United States). Radio modems are designed with specific frequency ranges for usage in the frequency band as defined by the ITU and FCC. While most terrestrial radio frequencies are restricted or require a license from FCC, the FCC has set aside some frequencies for unlicensed, free usage by the user. For environmental data communications, the term spread spectrum is often associated with unlicensed frequencies.

 

The FCC allows the use of spread spectrum technology in three radio bands, 902-928 MHz, 2400-2483.5 MHz and 5752.5-5850 MHz for radio transmission under 1 Watt of power. This power limit prevents interference within the band over long distances. However, one unlicensed frequency band often overlooked is known as MURS (Multi-Use Radio System), which includes five VHF frequencies (154.820, 151.880, 151.940, 154.570, 154.600 MHz).

 

The FCC formally defines MURS as a private, two-way, short-distance voice or data communications service for personal or business activities of the general public. MURS is different from other license-free radio spectrums that the FCC offers:

 

First, the radio may be of a higher power than other unlicensed spectrum. Under the MURS rules, a radio may have up to a maximum 2 watts of Transmitter Power Output.

 

Secondly, the FCC puts no restrictions on the amount of gain that a MURS antenna may have. The only restrictions are the antenna cannot be higher than 60 feet from the ground if free-standing or 20 feet higher than the structure it is mounted on.

 

The third advantage is that radios in a lower frequency range are less prone to having signals blocked by hills, foliage and other objects. However, the lower the frequency the larger the antenna must be to receive and transmit the signal.

 

If you would like to purchase these radios see License-free (FRS/MURS/CB) website.

 


Amateur Radio News Line

Amateur Radio Newsline Report #1705
Just right click or click on the link above select save target as and downlaod mp3 file to your computer or download and open it in your web browser. Run time approximately 30 minutes and is updated every Friday.

 

Release Date April 16, 2010

RESCUE RADIO: HAMS RESPOND TO CHINA EARTHQUAKE

 

RESCUE RADIO: HAM RESPONSE TO MEXICALI QUAKE FOLLOW-UP

 

RESCUE RADIO: GAREC-2010 DATES ANNOUNCED

 

RADIO THREAT: FCC EVACUATED DUE TO BOMB THREAT

 

RADIO LAW: FCC GRANTS DALLAS TEXAS AREA 97.113 WAIVER REQUEST

 

RADIO POLICY: FCC CITES IPAD AS ANOTHER REASON FOR BROADBAND SPECTRUM

 

and much more...

 

 

Please visit Amateur Radio Newsline Website for more details and information.