KB9MWR's Ham Radio Page


Introduction

Hello my name is Steve Lampereur, and my amateur radio service callsign is KB9MWR. I've been a ham since my Junior year in high school in 1996. I started looking into ham radio my freshman year, but I dragged my feet because I couldn't find a local testing session.

My dad had been in broadcast radio when I was in elementary, middle and high school. I spent time at the station as a kid, and my cousin was into electronics kit building, which I was enamored by.

Softmore year of high school a friend was thinking of getting into the hobby (but sadly never did) and showed me the Now You Are Talking book. I think was the first I ever heard of ham radio.

What caught my attention at the time was the phone patch (no cellphones back then), packet radio (internet hadn't yet blossomed), and the social networking aspect (no facebook or the like). At the same time I read an article by Larry Kollar, KC4WZK on the Amateur Packet Radio Network that was floating around on dial-up BBS's and really caught my attention.

So after being exposed to the Now Your Talking book, I walked to Radio Shack after school and got my own copy. After boning up on that, I called the 1-800-NEW-HAM number to find a local testing session. Sadly the only thing listed was 50 miles away, and I didn't feel up to asking my folks to drive me that far.

The next Christmas I asked for a police scanner from a local department store. Shortly there after, I stumbled into what I later understood to be a 2 meter ham radio net. This is how I learned of a local testing session in 3 days at a local high school. I got a ride, and passed.

I got into this hobby while in high school in the late 90's. Fortunately I found similar age and like minded peers through an adjacent school's ham radio/techology club.

Senior year an interest and personality trait survey identified strenghts in technical capabilites and problem solving.  After high school I attended Technical College to further my hobbies.  I was awarded a small scolarship from the South Milwaukee Amateur Radio Club  through the Foundation for Amateur Radio.

I've always been more interested in the experimental/technical side of ham radio, as opposed to the operational side. I like ham radio aspects that tie in computers, particularly if they incorporate the openness of the non-proprietary Linux opperating system.

My current areas of interest include; HSMM, Asterisk, Digital Voice applications, and microwave applications. I'm also always interested in elmering and encouraging new and younger hams to explore new ideas.

http://www.qsl.net/kb9mwr/

I live in the Village of Allouez just south of Green Bay and North of De Pere, WI.

Allouez has the largest population density of amateur radio operators per square mile in Brown County, WI. The Village is composed only 4.6 square miles of land, yet has nearly 45 hams.

What I do as a ham

Growing into the hobby with the Ashwaubenon HS Tech Club, as a  younger generation my interests in the hobby gravitate towards exploring and experimenting and suggesting a variety of new technologies for the amateur radio service.

My main interests are in (fast) digital communications (kb9mwr.ampr.org), and some homebrewing. Check out my blog,  and research projects.

Oddly enough the ability to talk all over the world doesn't really interest me.  HF to me is where you will find the oldest camp of hams, usually using SSB and older modes.  There simply isn't enough bandspace on HF to support the applications that interest me.  By comparison we have a huge microwave allocations, that is by far more precious this day in age to commercial interests and to any type of modern ham deployment.

I also periodically talk to local folks on VHF/UHF FM voice and meeting them at local club meetings and community events.  If your a local, I frequently monitor the Ashwaubenon HS Tech Club 147.075 MHz repeater here in town.

 

My QSL card, Ham radio file area, Local ham radio links, References to the hobby on TV cartoons

What is Ham Radio?

What is Ham Radio?: Amateur Radio (nicknamed "ham radio") is the greatest hobby in the world! Ham radio operators use a variety of different radio frequencies to make friends with people all over the world, communicate over orbiting space satellites, and provide emergency communications during disasters.

In the United States, Amateur Radio is administered by the Federal Communications Commission. The FCC requires hams show competency and knowledge of electronics, radio frequency safety, operating procedures, and basic rules and regulations by passing different written and Morse Code proficiency exams.

Hams in the Green Bay Area: See if a ham lives near you, maybe they can help you. List of licensed hams in Green Bay and check out the youth in the hobby and the local amateur radio clubs.

Have more questions about amateur radio? View the Ham-FAQ!

For more general information about Ham Radio visit the American Radio Relay League's webpage.

Take A Sample Test:You can now take a sample amateur radio license exam on-line! That's a tremendous help in studying, as it allows you to identify areas of the question pools where you might be having trouble, and it lets you gauge your progress. Just click here to take a sample test

Find a Test Session Near You: Once your ready to take your test, visit the ARRL VEC's homepage and find the next upcoming amateur radio test in your area! Or take a look at this local (WI) testing list.


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