EVARC Events/Announcements

February 22, 2015
Vol 15, No 05

 

- IN THIS EDITION -

 

EVARC Upcoming Events/Announcements
Weather Spotter Training - 2015
Test Sessions
Hamfests/Conventions
From the ARRL Letter - February 19, 2015
     ARRL Warns Experimental Licensee to Avoid Interference to HF Ham Activity
     US to Propose Additional Sharing of 10 GHz Band at WRC-15
     FCC "Paperless" Amateur Radio License Policy Now in Effect
     Exit Navassa, Enter Cocos
     Ulrich Rohde, N1UL, Wins Second Prestigious IEEE Award
     Hams Encouraged to Hit the Water for New US Islands Awards "One-Day Getaway"
    
In Brief
Education and Training
Closing Items

   

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EVARC Upcoming Events/Announcements

   

Next September meeting of the Elkhorn Valley Amateur Radio Club
Date:  Saturday, March 14, 2015
Time:  08:30 AM
LocationBailey's Bistro & Lounge
                 1201 S 13th St
                
Bring your ideas and suggestions for the clubs participation in the Annual Field Day

Minutes from the January 2015 meeting are available and can be read on the EVARC Web page

Visitors are always welcome to the meeting.
Bring a Guest to the Meeting

For more Information see the EVARC Web Page

 

·

EVARC Club Dues - 2015

Club dues for 2015 should be paid as soon as possible.  If you have not renewed your club membership for this year or would like to join the club, please send your dues to:

          Sue Askew
          c/o EVARC
          PO Box 1033
          Norfolk, NE  68702-1033

 

Midwest Division News

The Midwest Division ARRL Newsletter for February 2015 is available on the EVARC Web site.

·

Nebraska Section News

The Nebraska Section news for February 2015 is available on the EVARC Web site.

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l Weather Spotter Training - 2015
  March, 2015 - Upcoming
 
Day City, State Time Location
03 Norfolk, NE
(Madison County)
7:00 PM
CST
Lifeling Learning Center
Northeast Community College
601 E. Benjamin Ave
  Contact Information: brian.e.smith@noaa.gov
04 Neligh, NE
(Antelope County)
7:00 PM
CST
Fire Station
711 West 11th Street
  Contact Information: brian.e.smith@noaa.gov
18 Columbus, NE
(Platte County)
7:00 PM
CDT
Commuity Room
Courthouse Basement
26th Ave & 14th St
  Contact Information: brian.e.smith@noaa.gov
April, 2015 - Upcoming
Day City, State Time Location
08 Wausa, NE
(Know County)
7:00 PM
CDT
Fire Station
405 East Broadway Street
  Contact Information: brian.e.smith@noaa.gov
16 To Be Determined, NE
(Boone County)
7:00 PM
CDT
Location to be determined
  Contact Information: brian.e.smith@noaa.gov
20 To Be Determined, NE
(Cuming County)
7:00 PM
CDT
Location to be determined
  Contact Information: brian.e.smith@noaa.gov
  For a complete schedule check the Omaha NWS Web Site: http://www.crh.noaa.gov/oax/skywarn/outreach.php
 

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Test Sessions within 100 miles of Norfolk, NE

For more testing locations see the ARRL Testing Web page

 

03/05/2015
     Sponsor: Lincoln ARC
     Date: Mar 05 2015
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed)
     Contact: John P. Hauner
                     (402) 486-1400
     Email:
jphusker@earthlink.com
     VEC:
ARRL/VEC
     Location: Northside Cafe
                      2701 N 48th St.
                      Lincoln NE 68504-1425

 

03/13/2015

     Sponsor: Siouxland ARA
     Date: Mar 13 2015
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed)
     Contact: Gary L. Johnson
                     (712) 898-7631
     Email:
garywy0v@msn.com
     VEC:
ARRL/VEC
     Location: American Red Cross
                      4200 War Eagle Dr
                      Phone call is preferred
                      Sioux City IA 51109-1700

 

03/21/2015

     Sponsor: Lincoln ARC
     Date: Mar 21 2015
     Time: 10:00 AM (Walk-ins allowed)
     Contact: John P. Hauner
                     (402) 486-1400
     Email:
jphusker@earthlink.com
     VEC:
ARRL/VEC
     Location: Lancaster Event Center
                      4100 N 84
                      Lincoln Hamfest
                      ARRL Midwest Convention
                      Lincoln NE 68506-3230

 

03/24/2015

     Sponsor: AksarbenARC/Omaha Area VE Team
     Date: Mar 24 2015
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed)
     Contact: William H. Jackson
                     (402) 571-7540
     Email:
k9rz@arrl.net
     VEC:
ARRL/VEC
     Location: American Red Cross
                      2912 S 80th Ave
                      Near 84th and Center
                      Lower Level West Side
                      Omaha NE 68124-3250

 

04/02/2015

     Sponsor: Lincoln ARC
     Date: Apr 02 2015
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed)
     Contact: John P. Hauner
                     (402) 486-1400
     Email:
jphusker@earthlink.com
     VEC:
ARRL/VEC
     Location: Northside Cafe
                      2701 N 48th St.
                      Lincoln NE 68504-1425

 

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l Hamfests/Conventions
  03/21/2015
Nebraska State Convention
Start Date
: 03/21/2015
End Date: 03/21/2015
Location: Lancaster County Event Center
                4100 North 84th Street
                Lincoln, NE 68501
Website: http://lincolnhamfest.org/
Sponsor: Lincoln Amateur Radio Club
Type: ARRL Convention pending Executive Committee approval
Talk-In: 146.76(-)
Public Contact: Reynolds Davis , K0GND
                         3901 South 42nd Street
                         Lincoln, NE 68506
                         Phone: 402-488-3706
                         Email: K0GND@arrl.net
  04/11/2015
Hamboree 2015
Start Date: 04/11/2015
End Date: 04/11/2015
Location: Boone County Fairgrounds Community Building
                1601 Industrial Park Road
                Boone, IA 50036
Website: http://www.3900club.com
Sponsor: 3900 Club
Type: ARRL Hamfest
Talk-In: 146.850 - (no PL tone)
Public Contact: Clay Conard , W0FS
                         PO Box 286
                         Stratford, IA 50249
                         Phone: 515-838-2285
                         Email: cgconard@globalccs.net
 

04/18/2015
Bellevue Amateur Radio Club Hamfest
Start Date: 04/18/2015
End Date: 04/18/2015
Location: Harry Bossard American Legion Hall Post 32
                230 West Lincoln Street
                Papillion, NE 68046
Sponsor: Bellevue Amateur Radio Club
Type: ARRL Hamfest
Talk-In: 145.235
Public Contact: Ladonna Clark , KB0OUO
                         808 Gayle Street Papillion, NE 68046
                         Phone: 402-291-6774
Email: ladmclark@yahoo.com

 
 

For a complete listing of Hamfests go to the ARRL Hamfest Search page http://www.arrl.org/hamfests-and-conventions-calendar

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From the February 19, 2015 ARRL Letter

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ARRL Warns Experimental Licensee to Avoid Interference to HF Ham Activity

The ARRL has asked a Massachusetts company that plans to conduct experimental transmissions over wide portions of the HF spectrum either to avoid Amateur Radio allocations or to announce the times and frequencies of their transmissions in advance. The FCC last fall granted MITRE Corporation of Bedford, Massachusetts, a 2-year Part 5 Experimental License, WH2XCI, to operate 21 transmitters at 10 fixed New York and Massachusetts sites. MITRE plans to test wideband HF communication techniques on a variety of bands between 2.5 MHz and 16 MHz.

"[I]t will not be possible for MITRE to operate these transmitters within the Amateur Radio Service allocations...without causing harmful interference to a large number of Amateur Radio operators on an ongoing basis," ARRL Chief Counsel Chris Imlay, W3KD, said in a February 12 letter to MITRE.

Imlay said that if MITRE does not agree to avoid ham radio bands or to announce times and frequencies of transmissions ahead of time, it will ask the FCC to rescind the company's Experimental License or to impose a prior notification requirement "in real time for each and every use of the transmitters authorized at each site."

The WH2XCI Experimental License authorizes maximum bandwidths of 5 kHz, 500 kHz, and 1 MHz at effective radiated power levels of 6 W, 24 W, or 122 W. MITRE has indicated that most bandwidths would be between 100 and 300 kHz.

"At these power levels with the operating parameters proposed, it will be impossible to conduct your tests at any time within the Amateur Radio allocations and, at the same time, avoid harmful interference," Imlay said. He noted that MITRE already conceded this point in a technical exhibit submitted to the FCC with respect to its 1 MHz bandwidth mode.

Imlay said that when interference from MITRE's wide-bandwidth transmitters "inevitably occurs in the narrow-bandwidth, sensitive receivers" hams use, amateur licensees will have no way to determine the source of the interference or know to whom they might complain. "Thus, your assurance of operation on a 'non-interference basis' is meaningless under the circumstances, and yet that is both a special condition of operation" of the WH2XCI license and under FCC Part 5 regulations, Imlay told MITRE.

"It is ARRL's intention to ensure that this experimental authorization, improvidently granted to the extent that it includes heavily used Amateur Radio allocations, is not permitted to cause interference to ongoing Amateur Radio HF communications," Imlay concluded.

MITRE obtained the Experimental License to investigate high data rate wideband HF communication systems.

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US to Propose Additional Sharing of 10 GHz Band at WRC-15

The US proposal for World Radiocommunication Conference 2015 (WRC-15) Agenda Item 1.12 -- to expand the Earth Exploration Satellite Service (EESS) in the vicinity of 10 GHz -- supports allocating an additional 600 MHz of spectrum to the EESS (active) as a primary allocation in the frequency band 9.9-10.5 GHz, with certain limitations. The Amateur and Amateur-Satellite services have secondary allocations of 10.0-10.5 GHz and 10.45-10.5 GHz, respectively; the only current primary allocation is to Radiolocation. A study conducted by a Working Party of the International Telecommunication Union Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) concluded that the interference potential of EESS (active) to Amateur Radio was limited to very brief and infrequent periods.

"In this hotly contested frequency range, the best we can hope for is that sharing partners will be compatible with continued amateur access, and that is the case here," ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ, commented.

The US proposal does not include adding the United States to a "country footnote" that allocates the 10.0-10.45 GHz band to the fixed service in some Region 2 countries -- a position advocated by Mimosa Networks and strongly opposed by the ARRL. Mimosa Networks had petitioned the FCC to allow wireless broadband services in the band, which the ARRL has also strongly opposed.

The US proposal includes a provision that recognizes the Amateur-Satellite Service. "This proposal ensures that secondary Amateur-Satellite service operations in the frequency band 10.45-10.5 GHz that are advance published prior to the date of entry into force of the primary EESS (active) allocation in 9900-10,500 MHz are treated on a co-equal basis with EESS (active) operations," the US position states. After that date, presumed to be January 1, 2017, new stations in the Amateur-Satellite Service would be considered secondary to the EESS.

EESS use of the 9900-10,500 MHz band would be limited to systems requiring necessary bandwidths greater than 600 MHz that cannot be fully accommodated within the 9300-9900 MHz band.

ARRL Chief Technology Officer Brennan Price, N4QX, has been advocating on behalf of positions favorable to Amateur Radio at WRC-15 during the US preparatory process. He notes that administrations in Europe generally favor an EESS allocation down to 9.2 GHz and up to 10.4 GHz, sparing the Amateur Satellite segment.

A US proposal on WRC-15 Agenda Item 1.4, involving the possibility of an Amateur Radio allocation in the vicinity of 5 MHz, has not been finalized. US proposals on WRC-15 agenda items that already have been agreed upon are available on the National Telecommunications and Information Agency (NTIA) website. Each proposal represents the US position on WRC-15 agenda items for possible changes to the international Radio Regulations.

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FCC "Paperless" Amateur Radio License Policy Now in Effect

Effective February 17, the FCC no longer routinely issues paper license documents to Amateur Radio applicants and licensees. The FCC will continue to provide paper license documents to all licensees who notify the Commission that they prefer to receive one, but what arrives in the mail now will be printed on plain white recycled paper, instead of the more distinctive stock the FCC had been using until recently. All of this is part of the FCC's efforts to streamline procedures and save money.

"We find this electronic process will improve efficiency by simplifying access to official authorizations in ULS, shortening the time period between grant of an application and access to the official authorization, and reducing regulatory costs," the FCC Wireless Telecommunications Bureau (WTB) said. According to the WTB, the new procedures will save more than $300,000 a year, including staff expenses.

The Commission has maintained for some time now that the official Amateur Radio license authorization is the electronic Universal Licensing System (ULS) record, although the FCC had routinely continued to print and mail hard copy licenses until this week.

In mid-December, the FCC adopted final procedures to provide access to official electronic authorizations, as it had proposed in WT Docket 14-161 as part of its "process reform" initiatives. Under the new procedures, licensees will access their current official authorization ("Active" status only) via the ULS License Manager.

Licensees can also print an official license authorization -- as well as an unofficial "reference copy" -- from the ULS License Manager.

The ULS License Manager now permits licensees to change the default setting, so that the Bureau will print and mail a license document.

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Exit Navassa, Enter Cocos

The K1N Navassa Island DXpedition is now a part of ham radio history. The 15-member team wrapped up operations on schedule early on February 15. While some seekers went away empty-handed -- even after hours of trying to break the massive pileups (and some intentional interference) -- thousands were more fortunate. As K1N exited the world stage, another far more modest DXpedition on Cocos Island began operating the next day as TI9/3Z9DX.

The K1N DXpedition team at the Navassa Lighthouse.

Going into the DXpedition, Navassa Island (KP1) was the second most-wanted DXCC entity (after North Korea) on ClubLog's Most Wanted List. Cocos Island is number 25 overall.

From startup in the waning hours of February 1 until shutdown on February 15 at 1130 UTC, K1N logged 138,409 contacts with 35,702 unique call signs. A helicopter took the last three members of the DXpedition off the island on February 15 at 1500 UTC. They had remained behind to keep K1N active "until the last possible moment," said team member Glenn Johnson, W0GJ. "There was an excellent opening to Asia/Oceania almost all day and all night during the last 24 hours [of the DXpedition]."

Johnson thanked DXers who stood by while K1N worked areas of the world into which it had short propagation windows. "The Jamaica Amateur Radio Association members provided valuable support for all phases of our operation," he added.

The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) oversees access to the small island, and it has indicated that it would not allow any more DXpeditions to Navassa for another decade.

A log search engine and detailed contact statistics are on the K1N Navassa Island website.

As was the case with Navassa, access to Cocos Island is restricted. The small Pacific Ocean island is designated as a national park and does not permit inhabitants other than Costa Rican park rangers. Due to new regulations, the DXpedition will not use the TI9A call sign but TI9/3Z9DX.

The Cocos Island team, which includes operators from Costa Rica, Poland, and Russia, got off to a late and shaky start, but things have picked up. A storm on February 19 damaged some antennas, since repaired, and HF conditions have not been the best, but the team has uploaded an initial batch of nearly 6000 contacts.

Expedition leader Dom Grzyb, 3Z9DX, has asked for patience on the part of DXers hoping to put TI9 into the log, given the size of their "super low-budget" operation and the fact that two members are DXpedition neophytes.

Operation from TI9/3Z9DX will be on CW, SSB, and digital modes on all or most HF bands. The team will be on the island until February 23.

The island manager has assigned the team to a location that may work to the advantage of North American operators. The group has posted some photos on Facebook. Logs are being uploaded to ClubLog. -- Thanks to The Daily DX

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Ulrich Rohde, N1UL, Wins Second Prestigious IEEE Award

Ulrich Rohde, N1UL (ex-KA2WEU), has been named by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) to receive the prestigious I. I. Rabi Award for 2015. The award recognizes outstanding contributions related to the fields of atomic and molecular frequency standards, and time transfer and dissemination. The author of some 200 scientific papers and books, including several QEX and QST articles, Rohde was cited specifically for "intellectual leadership, selection, and measurement of resonator structures for implementation in high-performance frequency sources, essential to the determination of atomic resonance."

"I am really in disbelief and overwhelmed by this totally unexpected honor close to my 75th birthday," Rohde said in thanking Gregory Weaver, the 2015 Awards Chair of the IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium (IFCS) Standing Committee. "Since the age of 16, I have been fascinated with oscillators as well as their performance and their influence on atomic standards. Some of the results of my research are still the basis of all really high-performance oscillators."

Last year Rohde was the recipient of another IEEE IFCS honor, the C.B. Sawyer Memorial Award, which recognizes "entrepreneurship or leadership in the frequency control community; or outstanding contributions in the development, production or characterization of resonator materials or structures."

Rohde, who is the chairman of Synergy Microwave Corporation and President of Communications Consulting Corporation, will receive the Rabi Award at the 2015 Joint Conference of the IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium and European Frequency and Time Forum, held April 12-16 in Denver.

The award's namesake, physicist Isidor Isaac Rabi, received the Nobel Prize in 1944 for his discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance, which is used in magnetic resonance imaging.

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Hams Encouraged to Hit the Water for New US Islands Awards "One-Day Getaway"

"The people in this group were not ordinary people," McEtchin told The Paradise Post. "That is the kind of people that they were, they would just succeed at everything they did."

Fans of portable ham radio are encouraged to grab their equipment and head for the water as part of the new "One-Day Getaway," sponsored by the US Islands Awards Program. The annual event will debut on Saturday, May 9, from 0000 UTC through 2359 UTC (Friday evening to Saturday evening in the continental US). Founded in 1994, US Islands promotes portable ham radio operation from islands in all bodies of water -- lakes, rivers, streams, ponds, and coastal islands in US territorial waters.

"US Islands is a great way to go on a mini-DXpedition without spending a lot of money," said US Islands Awards Manager Jay Chamberlain, NS4J. "Discovering islands in your own backyard and setting up a station outdoors is always a good time. If hams have only operated outdoors during Field Day, we offer another route to get outside and enjoy portable ham radio in a different way."

The One-Day Getaway is an on-air activity, not a contest. No scores are tallied, and no prizes are awarded. Participation from all radio amateurs, regardless of experience level, is encouraged. Contacts may be made with any station. US Islands offers achievement awards for both island activators and island chasers, including a certificate for your first US Islands activation.

While there are some 2800 islands on the US Islands list, there are more than 17000 islands within the US. Participants can use Google Earth to locate new islands and be the first to operate ham radio from those locations.

Complete information on the US Islands Program, a how-to guide for One-Day Getaway participants, and a list of currently qualified islands are available on the group's website.

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lIN BRIEF
  • Solar Update - Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, Washington, reports: Average daily solar flux and sunspot numbers were down for the second week in a row. Average daily sunspot numbers for January 29 to February 4 were 139, then down to 81.6 the next 7 days, and now 54.6 during the February 12-18 period. The three averages for daily solar flux over the same periods were 151.1, 144.1, and 121.4. The latest prediction for solar flux is 120 on February 19, 115 for February 20-21, 120 for February 22-24, then 125 and 135 on February 25-26, 130 for February 27-28, 125 for March 1-5, 120 on March 6, and 115 for March 7-14. Solar flux then rises to 135 for March 23-25. Predicted planetary A index is 8 on February 19, 5 for February 20-21, 12 for February 22-23, then 10, 8, 5, and 10 for February 24-27, 18 for February 28 through March 1, 15 on March 2, 10 for March 3-4, then 5 and 7 on March 5-6, 10 for March 7-8, and 5 for March 9-13. The NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) has announced that it will suspend operations on Saturday, February 21, 1300 to 2000 UTC. During this period the SWPC website will remain in service, but it will not be updated with new data until the outage has concluded. In the event of active space weather or a reasonable chance of active space weather, the maintenance will be postponed.  This weekly "Solar Update" in The ARRL Letter is a preview of the "Propagation Bulletin" issued each Friday. The latest bulletin and an archive of past propagation bulletins is on the ARRL website.  In tomorrow's bulletin look for an updated forecast and reports from readers. Send me your reports and observations.

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l Education and Training
 
  • ARRL Certification and Continuing Education course registration - The ARRL has many ways to continue your education in things Amateur Radio.  For more information go to the ARRL Courses & Training web pagee.

  • FEMA Online Trainingg - FEMA has numerous Independent Study Program courses available for Ham Radio Operators and others interested in emergency support and are recommended by ARES.  For a list of courses check the FEMA ISP training web site.  Look for the 100, 200, and 700 series courses.

  • Weather Spotter Training - To be a certified Weather Spotter in the State of Nebraska, you must attend a weather spotter training session, take two on-line courses, and pass a written exam provided by your local Emergency Coordinator.  The on-line courses can be found on the ucar.edu web site.

  • Did you know you can practice code on-line? The ARRL posts their code practice files on the web. These audio files can be played on line or downloaded for later play back on your own computer. Practice files are available for 5, 7.5, 10, 13, 15, 18, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 Words per Minute. To find the files click the following link: http://www.arrl.org/code-practice-filesssss

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  • lCLOSING ITEMS

    The EVARC weekly net meets every Monday evening at 7:30 PM on the club 2 meter repeater (146.73 -). Check-in to the net to hear an update on activities of other club members,  announcements of local interest, and any late breaking information. Everyone is welcome to check in.

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    The purpose of this newsletter is to provide information to local hams with items of interest.  It is compiled from local, regional, and national sources an includes national, regional, and local news items and events.  Created by Monty Wilson, NRĜA. Contact  NRĜA with comments or questions.