EVARC Events/Announcements

March 14, 2015
Vol 15, No 08

 

- IN THIS EDITION -

 

EVARC Upcoming Events/Announcements
Weather Spotter Training - 2015
Test Sessions
Hamfests/Conventions
From the ARRL Letter - March 12, 2015
     FCC Enforcement Bureau Field Resources Poised to Shrink
     League Counters Another Mimosa Move for 10 GHz Wireless Broadband Sharing
     ITU Smart Sustainable Development Model Report Touts Amateur Radio's Advantages
     Fox-1A Ready for Launch, Fox-1D to Carry Radiation-Mapping Experiment
     Radio Amateurs Invited to Listen for Lambda-Sat
     Scientist-Radio Amateur Named to Receive Prestigious Award
    
In Brief
Education and Training
Closing Items

   

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EVARC Upcoming Events/Announcements

   

Next September meeting of the Elkhorn Valley Amateur Radio Club
Date:  Saturday, April 11, 2015
Time:  08:30 AM
LocationBailey's Bistro & Lounge
                 1201 S 13th St
                
Bring your ideas and suggestions for the clubs participation in the Annual Field Day

Minutes from the February 2015 meeting are available and can be read on the EVARC Web page

Visitors are always welcome to the meeting.
Bring a Guest to the Meeting

For more Information see the EVARC Web Page

 

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EVARC Club Dues - 2015

Club dues for 2015 should be paid as soon as possible.  If you have not renewed your club membership for this year or would like to join the club, please send your dues to:

          Sue Askew
          c/o EVARC
          PO Box 1033
          Norfolk, NE  68702-1033

 

Midwest Division News

The Midwest Division ARRL Newsletter for February 2015 is available on the EVARC Web site.

·

Nebraska Section News

The Nebraska Section news for February 2014 is available on the EVARC Web site.

·

ARRL Legislative News

The ARRL Legislative News is now available on the EVARC Web site.  Check out what legislation is being proposed and status of on-going legislation.

l Weather Spotter Training - 2015
  March, 2015 - Upcoming
 
Day City, State Time Location
18 Columbus, NE
(Platte County)
7:00 PM
CDT
Commuity Room
Courthouse Basement
26th Ave & 14th St
31 Fremont, NE
(Dodge County)
7:00 PM
CDT
Christensen Field Main Arena
West 16th Street
  Contact Information: brian.e.smith@noaa.gov
April, 2015 - Upcoming
Day City, State Time Location
08 Wausa, NE
(Know County)
7:00 PM
CDT
Fire Station
405 East Broadway Street
  Contact Information: brian.e.smith@noaa.gov
16 Albion, NE
(Boone County)
7:00 PM
CDT
Albion Fire Department
2580 South Highway 14
  Contact Information: brian.e.smith@noaa.gov
20 Wisner, NE
(Cuming County)
7:00 PM
CDT
Fire Station
1055 Ave D
  Contact Information: brian.e.smith@noaa.gov
  For a complete schedule check the Omaha NWS Web Site: http://www.crh.noaa.gov/oax/skywarn/outreach.php
 

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Test Sessions within 100 miles of Norfolk, NE

For more testing locations see the ARRL Testing Web page

 

03/21/2015

     Sponsor: Lincoln ARC
     Date: Mar 21 2015
     Time: 10:00 AM (Walk-ins allowed)
     Contact: John P. Hauner
                     (402) 486-1400
     Email:
jphusker@earthlink.com
     VEC:
ARRL/VEC
     Location: Lancaster Event Center
                      4100 N 84
                      Lincoln Hamfest
                      ARRL Midwest Convention
                      Lincoln NE 68506-3230

 

03/24/2015

     Sponsor: AksarbenARC/Omaha Area VE Team
     Date: Mar 24 2015
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed)
     Contact: William H. Jackson
                     (402) 571-7540
     Email:
k9rz@arrl.net
     VEC:
ARRL/VEC
     Location: American Red Cross
                      2912 S 80th Ave
                      Near 84th and Center
                      Lower Level West Side
                      Omaha NE 68124-3250

 

04/02/2015

     Sponsor: Lincoln ARC
     Date: Apr 02 2015
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed)
     Contact: John P. Hauner
                     (402) 486-1400
     Email:
jphusker@earthlink.com
     VEC:
ARRL/VEC
     Location: Northside Cafe
                      2701 N 48th St.
                      Lincoln NE 68504-1425

 

05/01/2015

     Sponsor: Siouxland ARA
     Date: May 01 2015
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed)
     Contact: Gary L. Johnson
                     (712) 898-7631
     Email:
garywy0v@msn.com
     VEC:
ARRL/VEC
     Location: American Red Cross
                      4200 War Eagle Dr
                      Phone call is preferred
                      Sioux City IA 51109-1700

 

05/07/2015

     Sponsor: Lincoln ARC
     Date: Apr 02 2015
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed)
     Contact: John P. Hauner
                     (402) 486-1400
     Email:
jphusker@earthlink.com
     VEC:
ARRL/VEC
     Location: Northside Cafe
                      2701 N 48th St.
                      Lincoln NE 68504-1425

 

05/26/2015

     Sponsor: AksarbenARC/Omaha Area VE Team
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed)
     Contact: William H. Jackson
                     (402) 571-7540
     Email:
k9rz@arrl.net
     VEC:
ARRL/VEC
     Location: American Red Cross
                      2912 S 80th Ave
                      Near 84th and Center
                      Lower Level West Side
                      Omaha NE 68124-3250

 

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l Hamfests/Conventions
  03/21/2015
Nebraska State Convention
Start Date
: 03/21/2015
End Date: 03/21/2015
Location: Lancaster County Event Center
                4100 North 84th Street
                Lincoln, NE 68501
Website: http://lincolnhamfest.org/
Sponsor: Lincoln Amateur Radio Club
Type: ARRL Convention pending Executive Committee approval
Talk-In: 146.76(-)
Public Contact: Reynolds Davis , K0GND
                         3901 South 42nd Street
                         Lincoln, NE 68506
                         Phone: 402-488-3706
                         Email: K0GND@arrl.net
  04/11/2015
Hamboree 2015
Start Date: 04/11/2015
End Date: 04/11/2015
Location: Boone County Fairgrounds Community Building
                1601 Industrial Park Road
                Boone, IA 50036
Website: http://www.3900club.com
Sponsor: 3900 Club
Type: ARRL Hamfest
Talk-In: 146.850 - (no PL tone)
Public Contact: Clay Conard , W0FS
                         PO Box 286
                         Stratford, IA 50249
                         Phone: 515-838-2285
                         Email: cgconard@globalccs.net
 

04/18/2015
Bellevue Amateur Radio Club Hamfest
Start Date: 04/18/2015
End Date: 04/18/2015
Location: Harry Bossard American Legion Hall Post 32
                230 West Lincoln Street
                Papillion, NE 68046
Sponsor: Bellevue Amateur Radio Club
Type: ARRL Hamfest
Talk-In: 145.235
Public Contact: Ladonna Clark , KB0OUO
                         808 Gayle Street Papillion, NE 68046
                         Phone: 402-291-6774
Email: ladmclark@yahoo.com

  09/12/2015
Ak-Sar-Ben ARC Flea-Esta
Start Date:
09/12/2015
End Date: 09/12/2015
Location: Sarpy County Fairgrounds 4-H Building
                Main Street
                Springfield, NE 68059
Website: http://www.aksarbenarc.org
Sponsor: Ak-Sar-Ben Amateur Radio Club
Type: ARRL Hamfest
Talk-In: 146.940
Public Contact: Dave Rice , N0JSB
                         8002 Crown Point Avenue Omaha, NE 68134
                         Phone: 402-571-8915
Email: davegr@netzero.net
 
 

For a complete listing of Hamfests go to the ARRL Hamfest Search page http://www.arrl.org/hamfests-and-conventions-calendar

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From the March 12, 2015 ARRL Letter

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FCC Enforcement Bureau Field Resources Poised to Shrink

According to an internal FCC Enforcement Bureau (EB) memorandum, the Bureau plans to ask the full Commission to cut two-thirds of its field offices and eliminate nearly one-half of its field agents. At the same time, the Bureau would develop a so-called "Tiger Team" of field agents as a flexible strike force it could deploy as needed. In the March 10 memorandum to Enforcement Bureau field staff -- obtained by ARRL and others -- EB Chief Travis LeBlanc and FCC Managing Director Jon Wilkins cited the need to take "a fresh look" at the Bureau's 20-year-old operating model in light of technology changes and tighter budgets. ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ, expressed dismay at the proposals.

"The ARRL is concerned that there is already no sense of urgency in the FCC's enforcement activities targeting spectrum polluters, such as utilities with noisy power lines, or the few violators in our own ranks," Sumner said. "It is troubling to see recommendations for such drastic reductions in the Commission's geographic footprint and the number of field agents at a time when the Field staff is facing ever-increasing challenges."

The EB and the Office of the Managing Director initiated an effort last fall to modernize the Bureau's field operations, the memorandum said.

"This project sought to ensure that the Field's structure, operations, expenses, and equipment were properly aligned with the Commission's overall mission and resources," LeBlanc and Wilkins said. The Commission hired outside consultants to analyze the EB's current "operating model," gathering input from employees, outside experts, and internal and external stakeholders.

Under its "Phase I" field modernization scheme, the Bureau will recommend to the full Commission that it adjust the primary focus of its reduced field office complement to RF spectrum enforcement. The EB will also recommend "adjusting" the number of field agents from 63 to 33. To compensate, part of that field staff complement would include what the EB called a "Tiger Team" of agents "flexible enough to support other high-priority initiatives." Under the plan, all field agents would have to have electrical engineering backgrounds "to support the primary focus on RF spectrum enforcement." The Bureau will also propose standardizing its investigatory and sanctioning processes.

Management would not be spared. Under the recommendations, the EB field organization chart would shrink from 21 to 5 director positions, and from 10 to 3 administrative support positions.

Under the proposals, the field office would reduce its "geographic footprint," from 24 sites to 8 sites and would "pre-position" equipment in several other strategic locations. Offices slated to stay under the plan would be New York City; Columbia, Maryland -- the site of the Bureau´s HF Direction-Finding Center; Chicago; Atlanta; Miami; Dallas; Los Angeles, and San Francisco. The EB would deploy equipment in or near several other cities, initially to include Kansas City, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, Seattle, San Juan, Anchorage, Honolulu, and Billings, Montana.

Part of the plan calls for the EB to establish "beneficial partnerships between the Field and other organizations that may support increasing our effectiveness."

During a March 4 US House Subcommittee on Communications and Technology Committee hearing on the FCC´s FY2016 budget, Rep Michael Pompeo (R-KS) pressed Wilkins on whether the FCC intended to close any field offices and eliminate any personnel. Wilkins attempted to dodge offering a direct answer, and hedged on whether any cuts were planned. He also said the Bureau had not yet received a final report from the outside consultant it had worked with. US Rep Greg Walden, W7EQI (R-OR), chairs the subcommittee.

A copy of the memorandum was sent to National Treasury Employees Union (NTEU) Local 209 President Ana Curtis. The NTEU represents many FCC staff members.

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League Counters Another Mimosa Move for 10 GHz Wireless Broadband Sharing

The ARRL has told several US House and Senate members that the 10 GHz band, where the Amateur and Amateur-Satellite services have allocations, is not a suitable place to expand wireless broadband. Three Republican and three Democratic lawmakers wrote FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler on March 2, asking the Commission to "explore potential sharing opportunities within the 10 GHz band" to alleviate "the well-documented spectrum crunch." The primary allocation of 10.0-10.5 GHz is for federal radiolocation, with Amateur Radio secondary in the entire band and Amateur-Satellite secondary at 10.45 to 10.50 GHz. The League pointed out that plans for additional sharing are already in the works.

"Based on extensive compatibility studies conducted during preparations for the 2015 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-15), additional sharing for an important scientific purpose is already planned," ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ, pointed out in a March 4 letter to the Congress members. Sumner explained that several years of work went into an agreed-upon US proposal at WRC-15 for a primary allocation at 9.9 to 10.5 GHz for the Earth Exploration Satellite Service (active), "subject to appropriate protections for incumbent services."

Sumner said the ARRL is satisfied that the Earth Exploration Satellite Service (active) "can be accommodated in the band without causing intolerable harmful interference to the Amateur Service," while the same would not be true for wireless broadband. "Accordingly," he concluded, "the ARRL opposes the introduction of wireless broadband into the 10 GHz band."

"A request by a wireless broadband equipment manufacturer to permit broadband was considered but could not be accommodated," Sumner added. That manufacturer, Mimosa Networks, filed a Petition for Rule Making (RM-11715) in 2013 that the FCC put out for comment last year, seeking the allocation of the band for what it has called "lightly licensed fixed wireless broadband use." Mimosa's petition included a band plan for 10.0 to 10.5 GHz that would cede to Amateur Radio and Amateur-Satellite users just two small segments of the present allocation. The company claimed its proposal would protect the 10 GHz frequencies most often used by radio amateurs. The FCC has not acted on the Petition.

Sumner noted that the FCC already has initiated a proceeding to identify spectrum above 24 GHz that can be designated for mobile wireless broadband, including additional spectrum that could be authorized on an unlicensed basis.

Democratic House members Doris Matsui and Anna Eshoo, both from California, and US Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey, joined Republican House members Brett Guthrie of Kentucky and Robert Latta of Ohio, and US Senator Marco Rubio of Florida in signing the March 2 letter to Wheeler.

"Sharing opportunities in the 10 GHz band could make more spectrum available and provide another avenue for consumers and innovators to tap into the Internet economy," the lawmakers told Wheeler. Mimosa Networks expressed support for the lawmakers' appeal in a March 3 media release.

In comments to the FCC last April, the ARRL told the FCC that Mimosa's Petition to permit unlicensed wireless broadband services in the 10.0-10.5 GHz band was "fatally flawed" and should be dismissed. The League told the FCC that, among other things, the Mimosa Petition is inconsistent with a US footnote in the domestic Table of Allocations, and that fact alone is sufficient reason for the Commission to quash Mimosa's request.

The footnote prohibits all non-federal services in the 10-10.5 GHz band except for the Amateur and Amateur-Satellite services and the non-federal radiolocation service. The FCC "is not at liberty to ignore" the US footnote, the League said, and is obliged on that basis alone to dismiss the Petition, "because it hasn't the authority to grant it."

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ITU Smart Sustainable Development Model Report Touts Amateur Radio's Advantages

The use of Amateur Radio in disaster preparedness and response was among “best practices” cited in the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Smart Sustainable Development Model Report for 2015. International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) President Tim Ellam, VE6SH/G4HUA, is a member of the Smart Sustainable Development Model Advisory Board, which prepared the report, published in January. The IARU is an ITU sector member.

“I strongly believe that telecommunications and [information and communication technology entities] are critical to saving lives as well as integrating communities and countries into the global economy particularly as we enter the post-2015 development era,” ITU Telecommunication Development Bureau Director Brahima Sanou said in the preface to the report, which deemed Amateur Radio operators “well suited to respond in times of crisis.”

“The resource of the Amateur Radio Service should continue to be utilized as new technologies are developed,” the report said. “However, the best asset the Amateur Radio Service brings to emergency communications transcends technology. It provides skilled people ‘on the ground’ who can communicate using whatever technology is available.”

The report cited trained volunteers and existing allocated spectrum as Amateur Radio’s primary resources. “Amateur Radio services can be used in any area with an active population of radio amateurs, and is uniquely suited to situations in which other communication networks have been disrupted,” the report said, noting that Amateur Radio “involves a community-driven response to disasters.”

The report mentions the Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS) and the “weak-signal” digital modes WSJT, WSJT-X, and WSPR developed as open-source software by Nobel Laureate Joe Taylor, K1JT, as “new technologies” that can benefit international disaster responses. “Amateur Eadio operators, while having access to the latest technology, are also able to make do with limited resources, as their equipment and networks are self-owned, but do not generate any income.”

The report said radio amateurs can provide “short-term immediate communication relief until such time as a commercial enterprise, such as a satellite operator, can place appropriate longer-term communications equipment.”

“The use of the spectrum and various operating modes by radio amateurs allow them to communicate down the street or around the world, which makes the Amateur Service a true, independent Information and Communication Technology,” the report pointed out.

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Fox-1A Ready for Launch, Fox-1D to Carry Radiation-Mapping Experiment

Following successful vibration and thermal/vacuum testing, AMSAT-NA´s Fox-1A CubeSat now sits in a clean environment awaiting launch, said AMSAT Vice-President-Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY. Fox-1A completed its Mission Readiness Review at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, California, on February 24 before a review board of Cal Poly and NASA representatives, he said, adding that Fox-1A delivery and integration has been set for March 25.

"From there, we won´t see her again, but certainly look forward to hearing from her again," Buxton said.

Fox-1A will include a Mode B (U/V) FM transponder and capabilities similar to the AO-51 satellite, which went dark in late 2011. The first phase of the Fox series 1-Unit CubeSats will allow simple ground stations using handheld transceivers and simple dual-band antennas to make contacts. The Fox-1 CubeSats will also be able to transmit continuous telemetry during normal transponder operation.

Fox-1A is scheduled to launch in late August from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, as part of the NASA Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program, which offers free launches to educational entities and encourages science missions. Fox-1A will host a Penn State student experiment with micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS).

Elsewhere, AMSAT and University of Iowa have agreed to include the University's High Energy Radiation CubeSat Instrument (HERCI) radiation-mapping experiment on the Fox-1D CubeSat.

"HERCI is intended to provide a mapping of radiation in a low-Earth orbit," said Don Kirchner, KD0L, a University of Iowa research engineer. "This is of scientific interest for planning CubeSat test flights for low-energy X-ray detectors."

The University of Iowa's history in spaceflight research dates back to the earliest satellites. As Kirchner put it, "HERCI can be considered a direct descendent of the first University of Iowa spaceflight instrument flown on Explorer I in 1958." He said the instrument is a senior design project by four UI electrical engineering students working under the supervision of the space physics engineering staff.

Buxton said the partnership is a win-win arrangement. "This partnership with the University of Iowa illustrates our strategy of leveraging the new CubeSat design to assist universities that need a way to fly scientific payloads while providing a viable ongoing platform for Amateur Radio," he said. -- Thanks to AMSAT News Service

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Radio Amateurs Invited to Listen for Lambda-Sat

Lambda-Sat -- the first Greek CubeSat -- was released from the International Space Station on March 4, following its launch last summer, and its developers have invited radio amateurs around the world to listen for the Lambda-Sat signal and file reports.

"You can help us to track and get the data from the Lambda-Sat while [it is] flying above areas not covered by our ground stations," the Lambda-Sat team said. The 1U CubeSat transmits AX.25-protocol UI packets at 1200 bps AFSK on 437.465 MHz. The 1 W transmitter identifies as KK6DFZ.

Lambda-Sat was constructed entirely by young volunteers from Greece, who traveled to Silicon Valley to participate in this project. Members of the Lambda-Sat team contributed to the construction of the satellite system through their knowledge in robotics, electronics, software development, and telecommunications.

"I want to motivate the youth in Greece to continue to dream," said the project´s initiator, Periklis Papadopoulos, an aerospace engineering professor at San Jose State University. "My goal is to demonstrate the capabilities of young people in Greece."

Lambda-Sat carries an experiment that measures the radiation effects on graphene in a low-Earth orbit environment. It also carries an Automatic Identification System (AIS) receiver for tracking all marine vessels within its footprint around the globe, employing an Iridium Short Burst Data (SBD) modem and making use of the Iridium constellation.

An article on the Lambda-Sat project by Cyprus Amateur Radio Society (CARS) Secretary Nestor Jacovides, 5B4AHZ, has been posted on the CARS website.

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Scientist-Radio Amateur Named to Receive Prestigious Award

Ajay K. Poddar¸ AC2KG, of Elmwood, New Jersey, has been selected by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) as the winner of the 2015 International Frequency Control Symposium W.G. Cady Award. Poddar, a chief scientist at Synergy Microwave Corp and an academic, was cited for "the analysis, design, and development of a host of frequency control products exhibiting state-of-the-art performance, including the development of extremely low noise crystal oscillator circuitry." The award marks the second honor for Synergy

Cady Award winner Ajay Poddar, AC2KG.

Microwave scientists this year, and the third in 3 years. Synergy Chairman Ulrich Rohde, N1UL (ex-KA2WEU), recently was named as the recipient of the IEEE´s I. I. Rabi Award for 2015, and last year he won the C.B. Sawyer Memorial Award.

"In the history of the IEEE, no company ever got all three possible awards in two consecutive years in this field," Rohde said.

In his current position, Poddar is responsible for the design and development of a host of frequency-generating components and signal-processing modules that hold performance records. Poddar has received more than a dozen awards for his scientific contributions and technological innovations, holds several dozen patents, and has published more than 200 scientific papers.

Poddar and Rohde will be honored at the 2015 Joint Conference of the IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium and European Frequency and Time Forum, held April 12-16 in Denver.

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lIN BRIEF
  • Solar Update - Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, Washington, reports: For the second week in a row, average daily sunspot numbers were down. According to ARRL Propagation Bulletins 6-11, the average sunspot numbers were 139, 81.6, 54.6, 59, and 54.1, respectively. Over the past week the number was all the way down to 32. On the other hand, for the second week in a row, average daily solar flux trended upward. Average daily solar flux numbers reported in ARRL Propagation Bulletins 6-11 were 151.1, 144.1, 121.4, 116.3, 122.9, and 127.8, respectively. These averages cover the dates from January 29 through March 11. Predicted solar flux is 125 on March 12-15, 130 on March 16-18, 125 on March 19, 120 on March 20-21, 115 on March 22-23, 110 on March 24-27, and 115 on March 28-31. Solar flux then goes to a high of 125 on April 2-15 before again dropping to a low of 110 for April 20-23. Predicted planetary A index is 18, 30, 18 and 8 on March 12-15, then 20, 18, and 12 on March 16-18, 5 on March 19-21, then 15, 20 and 8 on March 22-24, 5 on March 25-26, then 15, 30, 25, 12, and 10 on March 27-31, then 8, 10, 15, 12, 18, and 12 on April 1-6, 8 on April 7-8, and 10 on April 9-10. Looking all the way out toward the end of the 45-day forecast, planetary A index for April 24 is expected to be 30. As you can see, forecasters predict active geomagnetic conditions similar to those seen as previous solar cycles have turned down. The current sunspot cycle peaked about 1 year ago. This weekly "Solar Update" in The ARRL Letter is a preview of the "Propagation Bulletin" issued each Friday. The latest bulletin and an archive of past propagation bulletins is on the ARRL website.  For Friday´s bulletin, look for an updated forecast and reports from readers. Send me your reports and observations. -- Tad Cook, K7RA

  • Yasme Foundation Elects Two Directors: The Yasme Foundation Board of Directors has announced the election of Ken Claerbout, K4ZW, and Hans Blondeel Timmerman, PB2T, to the Board, effective with the Foundation´s upcoming Annual Meeting in Visalia, California. The action brings the number of directors to nine. The Yasme Foundation is a not-for-profit corporation organized to conduct scientific and educational projects related to Amateur Radio, including DXing and the introduction and promotion of Amateur Radio in developing countries.

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l Education and Training
 
  • ARRL Certification and Continuing Education course registration - The ARRL has many ways to continue your education in things Amateur Radio.  For more information go to the ARRL Courses & Training web pagee.

  • FEMA Online Trainingg - FEMA has numerous Independent Study Program courses available for Ham Radio Operators and others interested in emergency support and are recommended by ARES.  For a list of courses check the FEMA ISP training web site.  Look for the 100, 200, and 700 series courses.

  • Weather Spotter Training - To be a certified Weather Spotter in the State of Nebraska, you must attend a weather spotter training session, take two on-line courses, and pass a written exam provided by your local Emergency Coordinator.  The on-line courses can be found on the ucar.edu web site.

  • Did you know you can practice code on-line? The ARRL posts their code practice files on the web. These audio files can be played on line or downloaded for later play back on your own computer. Practice files are available for 5, 7.5, 10, 13, 15, 18, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 Words per Minute. To find the files click the following link: http://www.arrl.org/code-practice-filesssss

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  • lCLOSING ITEMS

    The EVARC weekly net meets every Monday evening at 7:30 PM on the club 2 meter repeater (146.73 -). Check-in to the net to hear an update on activities of other club members,  announcements of local interest, and any late breaking information. Everyone is welcome to check in.

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    The purpose of this newsletter is to provide information to local hams with items of interest.  It is compiled from local, regional, and national sources an includes national, regional, and local news items and events.  Created by Monty Wilson, NRØA. Contact  NRØA with comments or questions.