EVARC Events/Announcements

December 03, 2016
Vol 16, No 40

 

 

- IN THIS EDITION -

 

EVARC Upcoming Events/Announcements
Test Sessions
Hamfests/Conventions
From the ARRL Letter - December 01, 2016
     ARRL Issues Urgent Last Call to Press for Senate Passage of Amateur Radio Parity Act
     Transatlantic Reception Anniversary Special Event Set for December 11
     Amateur Radio Volunteers Provide Shelter Communication Support in Tennessee
     ARRL Expands Initiative to Fire Up Collegiate Amateur Radio Clubs
     FCC Special Counsel Laura Smith Says Amateur Enforcement Will Be Aggressive
    
In Brief
Education and Training
Closing Items

   

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EVARC Upcoming Events/Announcements

   

Next meeting of the Elkhorn Valley Amateur Radio Club
Date:  Saturday, December 10, 2016
Time:  08:30 AM
Location
First Choice Catering & Party
                
1110 S. 9th St.
                
Norfolk, Ne.
                 (The old Brass Lantern Restaurant)


Minutes from the November 2016 meeting are available and can be read on the EVARC Web page

This meeting is the annual officer election meeting.  Please plan on attending.

Visitors and guests are always welcome to the meeting.

For more Information see the EVARC Web Page

 

·

Training Programs Available

At the October club meeting we had two special guests.  They included Trent Howard, Region 11 Emergency Manager, and Jim Reider, KŘJWR, District Emergency Coordinator for Northeast Nebraska.  Both discussed the need for training to be able to become a Rostered Volunteer in Nebraska.  This training includes four courses available on the FEMA web site.  These are Independent Study courses, and are often required courses for additional training.  These courses are:

These courses take about an hour each and include a short test.  If you are interested in being part of disaster response in Nebraska, please take some time and take these courses.

Midwest Division / Nebraska Section News

The Midwest Division ARRL Newsletter for December 2016 is available on the EVARC Web site.

The Nebraska Sections news from October 1, 2016 has been posted.

 

 

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Test Sessions within 100 miles of Norfolk, NE

For more testing locations see the ARRL Testing Web page

 
 
12/27/2016
     Sponsor: Southwest Iowa ARC
     Date: Dec 27 2016 
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Gregory S. Ross
                   (712) 566-2698
     Email: Greg.Ross@BHMI.COM
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: American Red Cross
                    705 N 16th St
                    Council Bluffs	IA	51501-0105
 
01/05/2017	
     Sponsor: Lincoln ARC
     Date: Jan 05 2017 
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Christopher W. Evens
                     (402) 613-3484
     Email: webmaster@cvctrailblazers.org
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: Northside Cafe
                     2701 N 48th St.
                     Lincoln NE 68504-1425
 
01/28/2017	
     Sponsor: Siouxland ARA
     Date: Jan 28 2017 
     Time: 11:00 AM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Michael E. Nickolaus
                     (712) 223-3164
     Email: nf0n@longlines.com
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: South Sioux City Law Enforcement Center
                     701 W 29th St
                     South Sioux City NE 68776-3167
 
01/31/2017
     Sponsor: AksarbenARC/Omaha Area VE Team
     Date: Jan 31 2017 
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Gregory S. Ross
                    (712) 566-2698
     Email: Greg.Ross@BHMI.COM
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: American Red Cross
                    2912 S 80th Avenue
                    Near 84th and Center
                    Lower Level West Side
                    Omaha	NE	68124-3250
 
02/02/2017
     Sponsor: Lincoln ARC
     Date: Feb 02 2017 
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Christopher W. Evens
                    (402) 613-3484
     Email: webmaster@cvctrailblazers.org
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: Northside Cafe
                    2701 N 48th St.
                    Lincoln	NE	68504-1425
 
02/28/2017
     Sponsor: Southwest Iowa ARC
     Date: Feb 28 2017 
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Gregory S. Ross
                    (712) 566-2698
     Email: Greg.Ross@BHMI.COM
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: American Red Cross
                    705 N 16th St
                    Council Bluffs	IA	51501-0105
 

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l Hamfests/Conventions

 

 
Southwest Iowa ARC Flea Market
03/04/2017	
     Start Date: 03/04/2017
     End Date: 03/04/2017
     Location: McClelland Iowa City Hall
                     117 Main Street
                     McClelland, IA 
     Website: http://www.swiradio.org
     Sponsor: Southwest Iowa Amateur Radio Club
     Type: ARRL Hamfest
     Talk-In: 146.82-
     Public Contact: Greg Ross , N0GR 
                               22106 320th Street Minden, IA 51553
                               Phone: 712-566-2698
     Email: N0GR@arrl.net
 
Nebraska State Convention 
03/11/2017	
     Start Date: 03/11/2017
     End Date: 03/11/2017
     Location: Lancaster County Event Center
                     4100 N 84th Street
                     Lincoln, NE 68501
     Website: http://www.k0kkv.org
     Sponsor: Lincoln Amateur Radio Club
     Type: ARRL Convention pending Executive Committee approval
     Talk-In: 146.76
     Public Contact: Marlene McLaughlin , KD0HYM 
                               P.O. Box 84352 Lincoln, NE 68501
     Phone: 402-217-9252
     Email: kd0hym@gmail.com
 
Heartland Hams Hamfest
04/29/2017	
     Start Date: 04/29/2017
     End Date: 04/29/2017
     Location: Glenwood American Legion Hall
                     104 N. Pine Street
                     Glenwood, IA 51534
     Website: www.heartlandhams.org
     Sponsor: Heartland Hams Amateur Radio Club
     Type: ARRL Hamfest
     Talk-In: 145.29
     Public Contact: Donald Brown , W0AF 
                               53243 260th Street Glenwood, IA 51534
     Phone: 712-526-2080
     Email: w0af@arrl.net
 
 

For a complete listing of Hamfests go to the ARRL Hamfest Search page

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From the December 01, 2016 ARRL Letter

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ARRL Issues Urgent Last Call to Press for Senate Passage of Amateur Radio Parity Act

It’s now down to the wire: ARRL has issued a last call for members to urge their US Senators to support the Amateur Radio Parity Act (H.R. 1301) when it comes up during the “lame duck” session of Congress that adjourns in a couple of weeks. The House of Representatives approved the bill in September, and the Senate must follow suit if the bill is to succeed. If it fails in the Senate, the entire process will have to be repeated in the new Congress. The legislation is now in the Senate in two forms — as H.R. 1301 and alternately in the packaged bill S. 253

“We are on our final push for the Amateur Radio Parity Act before Congress adjourns,” said ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR. “The grassroots effort by the Amateur Radio community has been outstanding. Since September, over 110,000 emails have been sent to legislators in Congress. Thanks to everyone who has helped, but we can’t stop now. Please, keep the e-mails coming and also work the phones down the stretch. Call your Senators! We are almost there. Let’s get it done!”

ARRL Hudson Division Director Mike Lisenco, N2YBB, who chairs the ARRL Board’s Legislative Advocacy Committee and has been heavily involved in efforts to move H.R. 1301 forward, echoed President Roderick’s sentiments. He said the bill was just starting to build momentum in the Senate following its unanimous passage in the House, when Congress shut down for the 4 weeks prior to Election Day. He pointed out that H.R. 1301 has received broad support from both parties.

Lisenco had a special request of Florida radio amateurs. “Please write and call Sen. Bill Nelson and demand that he remove his hold on H.R. 1301 and support passage of this critical legislation.”

Urging your US Senators’ support is simple: Go to our Rally Congress page, enter your ZIP code, fill in your name and address, press enter, and e-mails will go directly to your Senators. Members may do this even if they have already contacted their US Senators for support.

There are no guarantees, Lisenco has pointed out. “In order to have a chance at overcoming political obstacles that have little or nothing to do with the legislation, we need our voices to be heard,” he said. “And we need that input today!”

President Roderick urged members to “reach out one more time to your Senators today! Right away Right now!”

September’s victory in the US House culminated many years of effort on ARRL’s part to gain legislation that would enable radio amateurs living in deed-restricted communities to erect efficient outdoor antennas that support Amateur Radio communication. The measure calls on the FCC to amend its Part 97 rules “to prohibit the application to amateur stations of certain private land-use restrictions, and for other purposes.”

While similar bills in past years gained some traction on Capitol Hill, it was not until the overwhelming grassroots support from the Amateur Radio community for H.R. 1301, and ARRL’s relentless and strident efforts on Capitol Hill that this bill made it this far.

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Transatlantic Reception Anniversary Special Event Set for December 11

An Amateur Radio special event on December 11 will commemorate the 95th anniversary of the first transatlantic shortwave reception between Greenwich, Connecticut, and Scotland. A school near the original site is hosting the event. ARRL, the Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB), and the Radio Club of America (RCA), are partnering in sponsoring the activity. The Greenwich Historical Society will also participate.

On December 11, 1921, reception in Ardrossan, Scotland, of a radio signal transmitted from the official test station of Minton Cronkhite, 1BCG, in a small shack on the corner of Clapboard Ridge Road and North Street in Greenwich, helped to usher in the age of global communication. The special event will use N1BCG, the call sign of Clark Burgard of Greenwich, who obtained that call sign to commemorate this bit of radio history. Burgard was instrumental in making arrangements for the event.

The N1BCG special event will begin on Sunday, December 11, at 1200 and conclude at 0300 UTC on December 12. It will include an attempt at a two-way contact between N1BCG and GB2ZE, operated by Jason O'Neill, GM7VSB, in Ardrossan.

Reception in Scotland of the 1BCG signal was part of the second series of ARRL transatlantic tests. For the receiving end, the ARRL Board had selected a receiver designed by Paul Godley, 2ZE, and Godley traveled to the UK to oversee that end of the circuit. Joining Godley in a field in Ardrossan, southwest of Glasgow, was Marconi Company District Inspector D.E. Pearson. As the QST article, "The Transatlantic Tests" (QST Dec. 2014) by Michael Marinaro, WN1M, recounted, "The two attempted to keep out of the driving wind and rain by sheltering themselves -- and their equipment -- in a tent. This rough listening post was comprised of a (superheterodyne and regenerative) receiver, a 1,300-foot Beverage antenna suspended 12 feet above ground, batteries, and auxiliary equipment."

On the morning of December 10, CW signals of 1BCG, which had been designed and constructed by Radio Club of America members -- were solidly copied on 230 to 235 meters (about 1.3 MHz). They were the only signals heard that morning in Ardrossan. By the end of the test, eight spark and 18 CW stations had been heard as well.

N1BCG operation will be on AM on 75 and 40 meters; CW and SSB on 40 meters, CW on 30 meters, and CW and SSB on 20 and 17 meters.

Approximate frequencies are 3.880 (AM), 7.290 (AM), 7.235 (SSB), 7040 (CW), 10.112 (CW), 14.280 (SSB), 14.040 (CW), 18.125 (SSB), and 18.088 MHz CW.

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Amateur Radio Volunteers Provide Shelter Communication Support in Tennessee

Amateur Radio volunteers this week provided communication support to American Red Cross shelters in Sevier County, Tennessee, where area residents fleeing wildfires took refuge. At the peak, an estimated 1,300 evacuees occupied six Red Cross or independently operated shelters, state authorities said. Wind-driven flames and embers from the Chimney Top Fire in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, now closed, spread on November 28 to threaten the communities of Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge in East Tennessee. Highway 441 into Gatlinburg remains open only to emergency traffic and outbound evacuation traffic. The fire caused considerable destruction in Gatlinburg.

"At this point, no additional Amateur Radio support has been requested," ARRL Tennessee Section Manager Keith Miller, N9DGK, said on Tuesday evening. "Members of nearby ARES® groups should remain aware of the potential for this situation to change rapidly."

Miller said no amateurs had been requested to support fire teams, law enforcement, EMS, or the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA). "Unless conditions begin to deteriorate, we expect not to be asked to fully activate but rather continue to monitor the situation and be ready to support when and if asked to do so," Miller said.

"Do not self-deploy," he stressed. "If you show up uninvited, you will be sent home."

TEMA said on November 30 that rain has provided some relief in Sevier County. "Gatlinburg reports all wildfires out, though some are still smoldering," TEMA said. Gatlinburg remains under a mandatory evacuation order and a 6 PM to 6 AM curfew remains in effect.

In Pigeon Forge -- home to the Dollywood theme park -- officials estimate that 500 residents and visitors were evacuated on Monday.

"State agencies and local officials likely evacuated thousands of residents and visitors from Sevier County [Tuesday] night, due to devastating wildfires in and around the cities of Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge," TEMA estimated on November 29. "It is very likely that 14,000+ residents and visitors evacuated from Gatlinburg alone."

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ARRL Expands Initiative to Fire Up Collegiate Amateur Radio Clubs

A growing number of campus radio clubs and student radio amateurs have begun to share ideas and suggestions on the ARRL Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative (CARI) Facebook page, which is aimed at sparking renewed participation, activity, and idea-sharing among this special sector of the Amateur Radio community. The now-expanded initiative stemmed from two well-attended ARRL New England Division Convention forums for radio amateurs attending college, one hosted by the Amateur Radio clubs at Harvard (W1AF) and Yale (W1YU). As the forum explained, the activity level at campus Amateur Radio club stations can vary wildly from one year to the next, as students graduate and newcomers arrive.

“The most common difficulty stems from uneven interest over time,” said ARRL CEO Tom Gallagher, NY2RF, in his “Second Century” editorial, “Cheers for College Amateur Radio: Sis-boom-bah!” in December 2016 QST. “Even the strongest leaders in college Amateur Radio graduate every 4 years, sometimes leaving their clubs without adequate continuity or leadership succession.”

Gallagher pointed out that “recognized” student activities require students in order to maintain that status. However, even officially recognized college club stations may find themselves at the mercy of administrations in terms of space for a station and antennas, and some clubs have had to move more than once to accommodate their schools’ space requirements. Issues involving safety and security can also affect college radio clubs.

In a recent post, Kenny Hite, KE8CTL, a graduate teaching assistant at West Virginia University, said the university’s Amateur Radio club, W8CUL, has been unable to participate in recent on-the-air events “due to lack of working equipment and questionable antenna setups,” as he put it. “We are working to identify working equipment/coax lines.” Another poster, Dennis Silage, K3DS, who’s associated with the Temple University Amateur Radio Club (K3TU), said, “A key to a successful and long-running college club seems to be faculty involvement for stability and recognition.” He invited other CARI participants to check out the club’s website to see what members have been doing.

“It occurred to us that, if college Amateur Radio could galvanize [mutual interests], then colleges might just provide the ideal bridge between youthful interest in the subject and lifelong participation in our community,” Gallagher wrote.

Some ideas are already being suggested, and the Facebook page has spurred communication among an ever-widening network of those involved or interested in Amateur Radio on campus, from students, faculty members, and administrators to college radio club alums. One suggestion has been to harness the competitive nature of colleges to organize operating events — perhaps with “conferences” resembling those for sports — to keep interest alive.

ARRL received permission to rebrand the Collegiate Amateur Radio Operators Facebook group, initially organized by Sam Rose, KC2LRC, as the ARRL Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative. All collegiate radio amateurs, clubs, and alumni are invited to participate and to get involved in activities that advance the art and enjoyment of Amateur Radio. All suggestions are welcome.

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FCC Special Counsel Laura Smith Says Amateur Enforcement Will Be Aggressive

FCC Special Counsel Laura Smith told a standing-room-only audience at the ARRL Pacific Division Convention (Pacificon) in October that, despite FCC cutbacks, Amateur Radio enforcement will not be compromised. Smith spoke for nearly an hour and a half on a variety of FCC issues related to Amateur Radio, and the entire presentation is available on YouTube, thanks to Bob Miller, WB6KWT, and his son Robert, KA7JKP, who recorded the forum. Smith said that with the FCC set to shut down 11 field offices across the country in January, the Enforcement Bureau has reorganized into three US regions, and she does not anticipate any significant issues for the Amateur Service as a result.

“The amateur community will go forward,” she said, noting that amateurs have “an incredible ability to self-police.” In light of the field office closings, she has been working with ARRL to revamp the Official Observer (OO) program.

“We are going to redo the entire program,” she told the Pacificon forum. Given that the field office cutbacks have left the FCC short staffed, the OO program will step into the gap, with OOs serving as the first line of defense in Amateur Radio enforcement, she explained. Working more closely with the OOs, Smith said, will get information on problems to the field staff more quickly, so they can follow up.

Smith praised the OOs for contributing their time and effort to monitor the bands and to alert licensees both to problematic and positive behavior on the air.

She also said the FCC is more aggressively policing the Amateur Radio bands, and she cited the case of an unlicensed individual in New York, who was arrested and assessed a fine for interfering with Amateur Radio repeaters as well as with public service communication systems.

“We’re aggressively going after people who are cutting into your frequencies,” Smith assured her audience. So far this year, she said, the FCC has proposed some $60,000 in fines to Amateur Radio licensees, for various alleged infractions. She said her office continues to receive complaints about intentional interference, and, she allowed, “Sometimes…okay, maybe all the time…we don’t get to [these] as quickly as you might like.”

Smith said there are “band neighborhoods” on the bands, and, typically, offenders tend to stick together, and “you can avoid that neighborhood,” she said. “If you know a frequency is a ‘problem frequency,’ don’t go there.” Those who do engage troublemakers on the air, however, become part of the problem. “Spin the dial,” she advised. “Walk away. Don’t allow that ugliness to seep in. Avoid it at all costs.”

“It bothers me that we have amateurs out there who are misbehaving,” she said, “when the bulk of you are incredible people.”

Smith returned as FCC special counsel to Amateur Radio enforcement in June after being detailed to another enforcement assignment for 2 years. Her position is now in the Spectrum Enforcement Division, which, she pointed out, gives her access to field engineers as well as to attorneys, engineers, and analysts in the Division.

She noted that it is now possible to file Amateur Radio-related complaints online and said doing so expedites handling.

HamRadioNow’s Gary Pearce, KN4AQ, used Smith’s talk as the centerpiece of his episode 281.

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l IN BRIEF
  • The K7RA Solar Update - Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Average daily sunspot numbers rose from 28.7 to 32.9 over the November 24-30 reporting week. Average daily solar flux rose from 78.5 to 82.6. Geomagnetic indicators rose only slightly, with average planetary A index changing from 12.7 to 13.6, and average mid-latitude A index rising from 10.1 to 10.3. Predicted solar flux is 85 on December 1-3; 80 on December 4-8; 78 on December 9-11; 80 on December 12-13; 82 on December 14-15; 80 on December 16-17; 78 on December 18-19; 80 on December 20-22; 82 on December 23-24; 84 on December 25; 83 on December 26-27; 80 on December 28-29; 82 on December 30-31; 80 on January 1-2; 78 on January 3-7, and 80 on January 8-9. Predicted planetary A index is 6 on December 1-6; 15, 12, 18, 20, and 10 on December 7-11; 5 on December 12-17; 8, 12, 16, and 22 on December 18-21; 30, 12, and 10 on December 22-24; 8 on December 25-27; 5 on December 28-January 2, and 15, 12, 18, 20, and 10 on January 3-7. Sunspot numbers for November 24 through 30 were 12, 12, 13, 31, 44, 43, and 75, with a mean of 32.9. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 79, 80.9, 81.2, 82.6, 85.2, 85.5, and 83.6, with a mean of 82.6. Estimated planetary A indices were 24, 33, 12, 10, 8, 5, and 3, with a mean of 13.6. Estimated mid-latitude A indices were 17, 24, 9, 9, 7, 4, and 2, with a mean of 10.3. Here is an interesting chart from London's Daily Mail. The blue line is an average of Solar Cycles 1 through 23. The red line is the current cycle 24, and the gray line is Solar Cycle 5, which may be similar to the current cycle.   Send me your reports and observations!

  • The Doctor Will See You Now! -  "Yagi Antennas" is the topic of the latest episode of the "ARRL The Doctor is In" podcast. Listen...and learn! Sponsored by DX Engineering, "ARRL The Doctor is In" is an informative discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like! Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor in Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of technical topics. You can also e-mail your questions to doctor@arrl.org, and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast. Enjoy "ARRL The Doctor is In" on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or iPad podcast app (just search for "ARRL The Doctor is In"). You can also listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never listened to a podcast before, download our beginner's guide.

  • JOTA 2016 Report Shows Participation was Up: The Boy Scouts of America has released the final report on the 2016 Jamboree on the Air (JOTA), and the news is good. Participation was up from 2015, despite what the report called "terrible propagation." According to the report, 10,761 Scouts took part, an increase of more than 50% from a year earlier, and the number of stations filing reports, at 267, jumped by 28% from 2015 (the record was 271 in 2013). The number of Amateur Radio operators was up by 14% to 1,120, although the number of radios reported in use dropped by 25% to 631. Total JOTA 2016 contacts remained flat at 8,254. Over the next several months, the BSA National Radio Scouting Committee will review various suggestions to determine improvements that can be made for JOTA 2017. These include concerns over conflicting on-the-air activities and the need for better advance publicity. -- Thanks to JOTA Coordinator Jim Wilson, K5ND

  • Dave Kalter Youth DX Adventure Offering Complete Ham Station to Essay Contest Winner: The Dave Kalter Youth DX Adventure (YDXA) has announced an exciting essay competition for young radio amateurs. Due to the generosity of the 2016 raffle winner Paul Ewing, N6PSE, and the co-founders of the YDXA, the winner of the essay contest will receive a complete Amateur Radio station. The prize includes an Alinco SR8T HF, a 12 V, 30 A power supply (Jetstream or equivalent), vertical antenna (Jetstream JTV680 or equivalent), and 100 feet of coax feed line fitted with PL-259 connectors. Eligibility is limited to Technician class or higher US licensees 12 to 18 years old, residing in the 48 contiguous US states. Entrants are to submit an essay of up to 500 words describing their involvement in, personal future plans for, and importance of Amateur Radio. All entries must be postmarked (or system dated, in the case of e-mail entries) by December 23, 2016. The winner will be announced no later than January 31, 2017. Entrants should adhere to all contest rules.

  • NCVEC Question Pool Committee Seeks Comments on the Technician Question Pool: The National Conference of Volunteer Examiner Coordinators (NCVEC) Question Pool Committee (QPC) is reviewing the 2014-2018 Technician question pool for revisions and updates. The QPC will accept comments and suggestions from the Amateur Radio community via e-mail through March 31, 2017. The NCVEC QPC will take all comments and suggestions into consideration as it updates the Technician question pool for 2018-2022. Input from the Amateur Radio community may include suggestions for new questions, changes to the topic areas, or changes to existing questions in any of the current Amateur Radio examination question pools.

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l Education and Training
 
  • ARRL Certification and Continuing Education course registration - The ARRL has many ways to continue your education in things Amateur Radio.  For more information go to the ARRL Training web page.

  • FEMA Online Training - FEMA has numerous Independent Study Program courses available for Ham Radio Operators and others interested in emergency support and are recommended by ARES.  For a list of courses check the FEMA ISP training web site.  Look for the 100, 200, 700 and 800 series courses.

  • Weather Spotter Training - To be a certified Weather Spotter in the State of Nebraska, you must attend a weather spotter training session, take two on-line courses, and pass a written exam provided by your local Emergency Coordinator.  The on-line courses can be found on the ucar.edu web site.
     

  • Did you know you can practice code on-line? The ARRL posts their code practice files on the web. These audio files can be played on line or downloaded for later play back on your own computer. Practice files are available for 5, 7.5, 10, 13, 15, 18, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 Words per Minute. To find the files click the following link: http://www.arrl.org/code-practice-files

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  • lCLOSING ITEMS

    The EVARC weekly net meets every Monday evening at 7:30 PM on the club 2 meter repeater (146.73 -). Check-in to the net to hear an update on activities of other club members,  announcements of local interest, and any late breaking information. Everyone is welcome to check in.

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    The purpose of this newsletter is to provide information to local hams with items of interest.  It is compiled from local, regional, and national sources an includes national, regional, and local news items and events.  Created by Monty Wilson, NRŘA. Contact  NRŘA with comments or questions.