EVARC Events/Announcements

September 30, 2016
Vol 16, No 34

 

 

- IN THIS EDITION -

 

EVARC Upcoming Events/Announcements
Test Sessions
Hamfests/Conventions
From the ARRL Letter - September 29, 2016
     ARRL Acting as Catalyst in College Radio Club Revitalization Campaign
     Amateur Radio Volunteers Go on Alert during Major Puerto Rico Power Outage
     Amateur Radio Credited with Role in Helping Injured Cyclist
     ARRL Outgoing QSL Service to Raise Rates
     More than 200 US Stations Signed Up for Scouting's Jamboree on the Air
     Retired Librarian Who Was Maine's First Woman Radio Amateur Turns 108
    
In Brief
Education and Training
Closing Items

   

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EVARC Upcoming Events/Announcements

   

Next meeting of the Elkhorn Valley Amateur Radio Club
Date:  Saturday, October 8, 2016
Time:  08:30 AM
Location
First Choice catering & Party
                
1110 S. 9th St.
                
Norfolk, Ne.
                 (The old Brass Lantern Restaurant)


Minutes from the July 2016 meeting are available and can be read on the EVARC Web page

Visitors and guests are always welcome to the meeting.

For more Information see the EVARC Web Page

 

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Boy Scout Communication Merit Badge

The club will be assisting the Boy Scouts with the Boy Scout Communication Merit Badge on November 5, 2016, in Wayne NE.  If you can help with this effort contact Fred, KĜFJW

 

Midwest Division / Nebraska Section News

The Midwest Division ARRL Newsletter for September 2016 is available on the EVARC Web site.

The Nebraska Sections news from September, 2016 has been posted.

 

 

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Test Sessions within 100 miles of Norfolk, NE

For more testing locations see the ARRL Testing Web page

 
 
10/06/2016	
     Sponsor: Lincoln ARC
     Date: Oct 06 2016 
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Christopher W. Evens
                     (402) 613-3484
     Email: webmaster@cvctrailblazers.org
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: Northside Cafe
                     2701 N 48th St.
                     Lincoln NE 68504-1425
 
10/14/2016	
     Sponsor: Siouxland ARA
     Date: Oct 14 2016 
     Time: 7:00 PM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Gary L. Johnson
                     (712) 898-7631
     Email: garywy0v@msn.com
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: American Red Cross
                     4200 War Eagle Dr
                     Phone call is preferred
                     Sioux City IA 51109-1700
 
10/19/2016	
     Sponsor: Amt Radio Assoc Nebraska
     Date: Oct 19 2016 
     Time: 6:00 PM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Allen D. Harpham
                     (402) 462-4619
     Email: aharpham@wd0dxd.com
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: Central Community College
                     Easy Hwy 6
                     Room 10     8
                     Hastings NE 68901-9999
 
10/25/2016	
     Sponsor: Southwest Iowa ARC
     Date: Oct 25 2016 
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Gregory S. Ross
                     (712) 566-2698
     Email: Greg.Ross@BHMI.COM
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: American Red Cross
                     705 N 16th St
                     Council Bluffs IA 51501-0105
 
11/03/2016	
     Sponsor: Lincoln ARC
     Date: Nov 03 2016 
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Christopher W. Evens
                     (402) 613-3484
     Email: webmaster@cvctrailblazers.org
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: Northside Cafe
                     2701 N 48th St.
                     Lincoln NE 68504-1425
 
11/12/2016	
     Sponsor: Bellevue ARC
     Date: Nov 12 2016 
     Time: 1:00 PM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Robert F. McCoy
                     (402) 871-5077
     Email: nb0b@arrl.net
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: Alegent Health Midlands Hospital
                     11111 S 84 Street
                     McArdle Suite
                     Papillion NE 68046-3920
 
11/16/2016
     Sponsor: Amt Radio Assoc Nebraska
     Date: Nov 16 2016 
     Time: 6:00 PM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Allen D. Harpham
                     (402) 462-4619
     Email: aharpham@wd0dxd.com
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: Central Community College
                     Easy Hwy 6
                     Room 108
                     Hastings NE 68901-9999
 
11/19/2016	
     Sponsor: Siouxland ARA
     Date: Nov 19 2016 
     Time: 11:00 AM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Michael E. Nickolaus
                     (712) 223-3164
     Email: nf0n@longlines.com
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: South Sioux City Law Enforcement Center
                     701 W 29th St
                     South Sioux City NE 68776-3167
 
11/29/2016	
     Sponsor: AksarbenARC/Omaha Area VE Team
     Date: Nov 29 2016 
     Time: 6:30 PM (Walk-ins allowed) 
     Contact: Gregory S. Ross
                     (712) 566-2698
     Email: Greg.Ross@BHMI.COM
     VEC: ARRL/VEC
     Location: American Red Cross
                     2912 S 80th Avenue
                     Near 84th and Center
                     Lower Level West Side
                     Omaha NE 68124-3250
 

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l Hamfests/Conventions

 

 
03/04/2017	
     Start Date: 03/04/2017
     End Date: 03/04/2017
     Location: McClelland Iowa City Hall
                     117 Main Street
                     McClelland, IA 
     Website: http://www.swiradio.org
     Sponsor: Southwest Iowa Amateur Radio Club
     Type: ARRL Hamfest
     Talk-In: 146.82-
     Public Contact: Greg Ross , N0GR 
                               22106 320th Street Minden, IA 51553
                               Phone: 712-566-2698
     Email: N0GR@arrl.net
 
 

For a complete listing of Hamfests go to the ARRL Hamfest Search page

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From the September 29, 2016 ARRL Letter

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ARRL Acting as Catalyst in College Radio Club Revitalization Campaign

ARRL is serving as a catalyst in a nascent campaign -- "Ivy + Amateur Radio" -- to boost college and university Amateur Radio club interest, membership, and activity. The initiative sprang from a conversation earlier this year between ARRL CEO Tom Gallagher, NY2RF, and retired Yale University staffer Dr Martin Ewing, AA6E, about how to get colleges and universities to revitalize their ham clubs. Ewing relayed the message to the president of the Yale University Amateur Radio Club (W1YU), who, in turn, contacted the president of the Harvard University Amateur Radio Club (W1AF).

The two schools subsequently sponsored what turned out to be a standing-room-only forum at the 2016 ARRL New England Division Convention in Massachusetts over the September 10-11 weekend, with representatives from Harvard, Yale, Penn, and MIT on hand.

"They all share common problems, which include finding suitable space, finding faculty or staff sponsors -- preferably permanent -- and providing for an orderly succession of student leadership," said Gallagher, who attended the forum and moderated the hour-long idea exchange that followed. Gallagher said a college club shouldn't fall into decline just because students graduate.

"Undergraduates are busy people, they're all competing for the top jobs and have busy social lives," Gallagher allowed. "Sometimes it's difficult for Amateur Radio to compete with those other interests." During the Convention and at the forum, ARRL gave copies of the 2016 ARRL Handbook to all college and university attendees.

Representatives of the Ivy League clubs are planning to meet -- possibly in New York -- in December. "There's a lot of work to do before that next meeting," Gallagher said. "We want to create a reflector, we want to create a mailing list, we want to reach out to all the clubs that did not show up. And of course we welcome college clubs to join us." He said a senior member of the Yale team offered a "generous contribution" to ARRL to support the Ivy + Amateur Radio initiative. Initial efforts will include a newsletter and a Facebook page.

Gallagher stressed that the outreach initiative is not limited to Ivy League schools, although that has been the initial focus. "We welcome the participation of everyone," Gallagher said, "but the Ivies and MIT stepped up in a leadership role. The Ivy schools are very competitive with each other, and college students are very competitive with each other, and what we want to do is to put that competitive energy to work to fashion wider college Amateur Radio club participation in the process." Gallagher noted that many state colleges and universities already have active Amateur Radio clubs. "We hope they'll join us in what will become an ever-widening circle," he said.

Contact Tom Gallagher, NY2RF, for more information.

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Amateur Radio Volunteers Go on Alert during Major Puerto Rico Power Outage

Amateur Radio volunteers went on alert following an afternoon explosion on September 21 at a power station in Salinas that left some 1.5 million residents of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico without power. ARRL Public Information Coordinator Angel Santana, WP3GW, said that as the evening wore on, the most sought-after items were ice and potable water -- which depend on electricity to power the pumps that deliver it. The outage also resulted in traffic jams due to non-functioning signal lights. The governor of Puerto Rico declared a State of Emergency.

"On the Amateur Radio side, the VHF/UHF linked repeater system of the Federación de Radio Aficionados de Puerto Rico (FRA), an ARRL-affiliated club, was the main source of information," Santana told ARRL. "As soon as the situation began, lots of mobile and portable stations got on the air from east to west to report on the power loss, and ham radio was among the first to report the explosion, as smoke was observed soaring toward the sky."

According to FEMA, the fire at the Salinas switching station caused the island-wide power generation plant to shut down as a safety precaution. FEMA said that all critical facilities operated on back-up generators, and airports, police stations, and water plants received priority as power was restored. The agency said telecommunications were operating normally.

Santana said designated repeaters on 2 meters and 70 centimeters that remained up and running served as the primary network for any emergency or health care traffic. On HF, Antonio Santiago, KP4IA, in Toa Alta was "the main source of what was happening even before the situation got to the mainland news services," checking into nets on 20, 40, and 75 meters and relaying information about the situation to other amateur stations on the mainland, Santana said.

Santana said that two cellular phone companies had problems, and at least one death was reported, due to carbon monoxide poisoning from a generator. A few vehicle accidents also occurred, he said.

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Amateur Radio Credited with Role in Helping Injured Cyclist

Members of the Huntsville Amateur Radio Club (HARC) in Alabama had a role in getting help for a Louisiana cyclist injured in a September 17 group ride in Madison County, Alabama.

A representative of the sponsoring Spring City Cycling Club told WHNT-19 News that a number of riders -- including Brian Guerrero, who was seriously injured -- fell as a motor vehicle was passing in the opposite direction. The cycling club spokesperson said it was unlikely the motorist caused or contributed to the accident. An investigation continues. The club praised the action of first responders and first aid from fellow cyclists -- a trauma surgeon and a nurse.

"Their actions in first aid and in directly calling for MedFlight likely saved [Guerrero's] life. Huntsville Amateur Radio Club volunteers were instrumental in coordinating the communications among event organizers and volunteers, emergency personnel, and law enforcement. We extend our gratitude to law enforcement, first responders, and HARC for their able and quick response to this terrible incident," the cycling club said. -- Thanks to WHNT-19 News

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ARRL Outgoing QSL Service to Raise Rates

Although ARRL believes it's important to maintain the long-standing tradition of the ARRL Outgoing QSL Service as a membership benefit, increased administration costs will require an increase in rates, in order to keep the Service available and viable.

"The Service has been a member benefit for decades," an ARRL statement said. "Since its official formation in November 1976, tens of millions of QSL cards have been shipped from ARRL Headquarters to Amateur Radio QSL bureaus of other national societies worldwide. At one time, this benefit offered a safe, reliable, and inexpensive way to exchange QSL cards for a fraction of the cost of the postal service. What amateurs saved in financial cost, however, was made up for in time; it could take months, or even years, to send and receive a QSL through the bureau."

Effective on November 1, the rate for 1 ounce of outgoing QSLs via the Service will increase to match the 1 ounce USPS international postage rate. As of September 2016, this rate is $1.15 per ounce -- about 10 cards. An additional service fee of $7 will be charged per individual transaction, to cover administrative costs.

ARRL said QSLing is very different now, and, while postal services are generally more reliable than in years past, international shipping costs have risen significantly. "With the advent of the Internet and online QSL confirmation services such as ARRL's Logbook of The World, fewer and fewer paper cards are being exchanged," the ARRL statement observed.

Calling the Outgoing QSL Service "a significant tradition in the world of Amateur Radio," the League said it's committed to keeping that tradition and service alive for members who enjoy using it. "We are committed to ensuring our members will be able to send their QSL cards through the Service for decades to come."

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More than 200 US Stations Signed Up for Scouting's Jamboree on the Air

So far, 219 US stations have registered to take part in Scouting's 2016 Jamboree on the Air (JOTA), which will take place October 14-16. Registration remains open for the 59th annual event. Last year, 400 US stations signed up. JOTA officials are asking JOTA 2016 participants not only to register for this year's event, but to follow up with a post-JOTA report.

"We expect to have several thousand stations around the world signed up by JOTA weekend," JOTA Coordinator Jim Wilson, K5ND, said in a JOTA-JOTI (Jamboree on the Internet) update. "Make sure you register your station." Designated Scouting frequencies are on the "Guidelines for Amateur Radio Operators" page. "Twenty meters is probably the go-to band during the daytime," Wilson said. "Try moving off the calling frequency and spreading out while making those contacts." Wilson noted that, in addition to the DX spotting websites, there's a Scout station spotting cluster.

He also suggested taking advantage of "modes that don't require radio waves," including the dedicated D-STAR Scouting reflector 033A, as well as DMR, IRLP with topic channel 9091, and Echolink, with conference node JOTA-365. Doug Crompton, WA3DSP, and Elliott Liggett, W7QED, have set up Allstar node 41760 for JOTA/Scouting conversations, Wilson added. In addition to social media, ScoutLink is an excellent way to connect to Scouts around the world with only an Internet connection, he said.

"Dave Edwards, KD2E, and Andy O'Brien, K3UK, have developed a Scout scheduling page," Wilson said. "You can use this to post your frequency and to pick up on other stations as well."

More than 1 million Scouts in 150+ countries -- at nearly 18,000 stations -- are expected to take part in JOTA 2016, engaging with other Scouts to talk about Amateur Radio and their Scouting experiences. "JOTA is about conversations across town and around the world, rather than about contacts," Wilson said.

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Retired Librarian Who Was Maine's First Woman Radio Amateur Turns 108

Mary Cousins, ex-W1GSC, who was the first woman in Maine to obtain an Amateur Radio license, celebrated her 108th birthday on September 20. Now a resident of a care facility in the coastal fishing village of Deer Isle, Cousins was treated to a party complete with a cake decorated with images of local newspaper articles from 1908, the year she was born. The confection also bore an image of her 1933 "Amateur First" radio license, issued to Mary Sibyl Wallace -- her maiden name -- by the old Federal Radio Commission, when Cousins was 24. The FCC came into being the following year. Cousins' old call sign has since been reissued at least once. Cousins said she operated Morse, although she does not remember the code anymore, and used to relay weather information using that mode.

Cousins, a native of nearby Stonington, Maine, worked as the town's librarian, a school bus driver, and a telephone operator. She said she never stops learning new things.

Cousins told Bangor TV station WFVX that in the 1930s, ham radio "was something that the girls did not do, and the boys were all doing it at the time, and I said, 'I can do it too.' And I did."

Her cake also bore images of Stonington as it looked in 1908, when Teddy Roosevelt was the US president. Enlivening the party were 108 balloons and live piano music. Cousins received and read cards from many well-wishers.

Her son John told WFVX, "When she decides she's going to do something, she's going to do it. I think 100 was going to be the goal. She wanted to reach 100. She did. And then she said, 'Well, might as well go for 105.' I think she's working on 110 now."

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l IN BRIEF
  • The K7RA Solar Update - Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Australia's Space Weather Services issued a geomagnetic warning, calling for variable geomagnetic conditions -- from active to major storms -- for the next 3 days. Average daily sunspot numbers and solar flux changed little for September 22-28 from the previous 7 days. Average daily sunspot numbers went from 29.7 to 29.9, and the average daily solar flux declined from 83.4 to 81.4. The average planetary A index was much higher, rising from 8.9 to 19.7. The average mid-latitude A index increased from 7.6 to 12.3. Projected solar flux for the near term is 85, 80, and 78 for September 29-October 1; 80 on October 2-3; 85 on October 4-7; 90 on October 8-14; 95 on October 15-18; 90 on October 19-21; 85 on October 22-27; 80 on October 28-31; 85 on November 1-3, and 90 on November 4-10. Predicted planetary A index is 44, 38, 30, 20, 14, 12, and 8 for September 29-October 5; 5 on October 6-14; 8, 10, 20, and 8 on October 15-18; 5 on October 19-22; 18 and 12 on October 23-24; 35 on October 25-27; 25, 20, 16, 10, and 8 on October 28-November 1, and 5 on November 2-10. Sunspot numbers for September 22 through 28 were 30, 49, 47, 18, 23, 21, and 20, with a mean of 29.7. The 10.7 centimeter flux was 85.1, 85.5, 84.9, 84.6, 86.8, 85.6, and 84.4, with a mean of 81.4. Estimated planetary A indices were 4, 4, 5, 23, 22, 38, and 42, with a mean of 19.7. Estimated mid-latitude A indices were 4, 3, 4, 12, 18, 21, and 24, with a mean of 12.3.  Send me your reports and observations!

  • The Doctor Will See You Now! -  "Coping with the Solar Minimum" is the topic of the latest episode of the "ARRL The Doctor is In" podcast. Listen...and learn! Sponsored by DX Engineering, "ARRL The Doctor is In" is an informative discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like! Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor in Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of technical topics. You can also e-mail your questions to doctor@arrl.org, and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast. Enjoy "ARRL The Doctor is In" on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or iPad podcast app (just search for "ARRL The Doctor is In"). You can also listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never listened to a podcast before, download our beginner's guide. Just ahead: "Bits vs Baud".

  • ARRL to Host CHIRP Radio Programming Webinar: ARRL will host a CHIRP Radio Programming webinar on October 19 at 8 PM ET (0000 UTC on October 20 in US time zones). This presentation will offer a brief overview of the free, open-source CHIRP software, which can be used to program most radios. Attendees will learn: What CHIRP is, which radios are supported, how to get CHIRP, and how to troubleshoot CHIRP. Presenter James Lee, N1DDK, became active in CHIRP development for the initial TYT9800 driver. He is a hardware development engineer for Qualcomm. Register now! Those signing up will receive a confirmation e-mail containing information about joining the webinar.

  • Logbook of The World to No Longer Accept Contacts Signed by TQSL Versions Earlier Than 2.0: As of 1400 UTC on January 16, ARRL's Logbook of The World (LoTW) no longer will accept contacts that have been digitally signed by versions of TQSL earlier than version 2.0. Users of earlier versions are encouraged to upgrade as soon as possible, as older TQSL versions contain uncorrected defects and display inaccurate error messages. The current versions of TQSL for Windows, OS X, and Linux are available online at https://lotw.arrl.org/lotw-help/installation/. -- Thanks to Norm Fusaro, W3IZ

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l Education and Training
 
  • ARRL Certification and Continuing Education course registration - The ARRL has many ways to continue your education in things Amateur Radio.  For more information go to the ARRL Training web page.

  • FEMA Online Training - FEMA has numerous Independent Study Program courses available for Ham Radio Operators and others interested in emergency support and are recommended by ARES.  For a list of courses check the FEMA ISP training web site.  Look for the 100, 200, and 700 series courses.

  • Weather Spotter Training - To be a certified Weather Spotter in the State of Nebraska, you must attend a weather spotter training session, take two on-line courses, and pass a written exam provided by your local Emergency Coordinator.  The on-line courses can be found on the ucar.edu web site.
     

  • Did you know you can practice code on-line? The ARRL posts their code practice files on the web. These audio files can be played on line or downloaded for later play back on your own computer. Practice files are available for 5, 7.5, 10, 13, 15, 18, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 Words per Minute. To find the files click the following link: http://www.arrl.org/code-practice-filesssssss

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  • lCLOSING ITEMS

    The EVARC weekly net meets every Monday evening at 7:30 PM on the club 2 meter repeater (146.73 -). Check-in to the net to hear an update on activities of other club members,  announcements of local interest, and any late breaking information. Everyone is welcome to check in.

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    The purpose of this newsletter is to provide information to local hams with items of interest.  It is compiled from local, regional, and national sources an includes national, regional, and local news items and events.  Created by Monty Wilson, NRĜA. Contact  NRĜA with comments or questions.